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Verizon store to open on Vernon Blvd., replaces Snob Nail Spa

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Nov. 30, 2016 Staff Report

A Verizon store is opening on Vernon Boulevard next month where Snob Nail Spa was located.

The Verizon store is expected to start business on December 10, according to workers, at its new 47-34 Vernon Blvd location.

Verizon takes the space of Snob that recently closed.

Snob was among the first upscale spas to arrive in Long Island City when it opened about five years ago.

 

 

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21 Comments

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Anonymous

Its not a Verizon corporate store and it is not just there to advertise. It’s an independent store that is a Verizon “premium retailer” So if you get a phone at this location they get a commission every month you keep the service. Its the way Radio Shack is still hanging on. If you opened your phone account at Radio Shack 20 years ago and still have the same number, they are still getting a commission every month from the service carrier.

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Anonymous

So I should be happy we get some lame, dead Verizon store because the owners make a monthly commission? I don’t understand your point.

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I know too many people

Can I point out that originally many were against Snob opening but I agree that Verizon is just advertising their brand. The store on Jackson was always empty and uninviting. Neighborhood killers is right

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Donald

Verizon store already went out of business a few years ago underneath the Solarium condos on 48th ave which had a way less rent then this one just signed,.That one was owned by the same guy who owns the nail spa underneath 4705 Center Blvd building,.. You can count on one hand how many walkins he recieved during the day. I doubt very much the new population count will make much of a change.When people need a cell phone store that is usually during business hours while they are in manhattan. ,.. I wish them much success, butttt I give them a few months before they realize this was a bad decision.

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LICLady

I miss Snob, and feel badly for the lovely women who worked there (several of them for quite a few years) and who are presumably now out of a job.

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brooklynmc

My wife misses Snob as well and wishes she could find the woman who she always went to. That was a business that served the people in the community well.

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LICfly

I can’t remember the last time I needed/wanted to visit a brick & mortar wireless store. What am I missing? Serious question.

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brooklynmc

Oh well. I can barely afford to live here anymore anyways. That’s the price of “success”. Next there will be another Chipotle and a Starbucks. Manhattan has already been ruined by banks, pharmacies and chains. But, I honestly just don’t think this is a good fit for the neighborhood and it will be gone soon. This part of LIC is dead during the day. It is a bedroom community. Nannies and children are not going to be buying cell phones all day.

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Jason

People get real! Any business is a PLUS! So stop bitching about it. Plus the rent is so high that these types of chain stores are about the only ones who can afford it. If anyone is to blame its the landlords, but if you were the property owner you would seeking out any tenant that’s willing to shell out the highest price for your property too! Hate to break it to you but, your local mom and pop small business has become a thing of the past. It’s all about Money, Money, Money!!!! The other option is if you don’t really like the neighborhood you can always move.

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B King

If anyone is to blame it is the city of New York that raises property taxes 10-20% a year on commercial properties just because they are in gentrified or gentrifying neighborhoods. The city requires commercial landlords to fill out income and expense forms but it doesn’t matter to them if you charge $15/sq ft or $150/sq ft – your taxes will rise the same unpredictable amount.

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brooklynmc

You are off target. People do not have to praise any new business in the neighborhood just because any new business is a plus. Wrong. Also, we don’t need a lesson in economics and capitalism. You little snot.

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glad to see

Lets be glad people want to invest their money and open businesses here. BTW they are also going to fix screens and perform other services that are not available in the neighborhood right now. Welcome and thanks for coming to LIC!

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Kyle

Unfortunately, they don’t fix a lot of things here besides phones. There is a Computech Center on Jackson Ave that was able to fix my computer.

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Max

They actually fix everything. Computers, iPhones, Android phones … and pretty quickly.

They fixed my P.C.

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Delilah

Ugh. I really don’t want to pass a Verizon store everyday. This definitely downgrades our neighborhood. Put in a McDonald’s and an Applebee’s too while you’re at it.

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Anonymous

ugh… I really don’t want to pass a Verizon store everyday. This definitely downgrades our neighborhood.

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Max

Well many people complained they have to go to Manhattan if they have some urgency with their phone. Now you got it and it’s really boutique store

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