You are reading

Long Island City Child Play Space to Close Permanently

City Owlets 10-42 Jackson Avenue

May 4, 2020 By Allie Griffin

A Long Island City children’s play space and cafe is closing permanently after struggling to stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic.

City Owlets play cafe, located at 10-42 Jackson Ave., closed on March 15 and will not reopen when the state permits nonessential businesses to do so.

The owner and founder Linda Nguyen said she has no choice but to permanently close the play cafe because of overhead expenses.

“At the end of the day, we are a small business with ridiculous overhead expenses,” she wrote in an announcement. “Unfortunately, we are not able to sustain operations to re-open and are faced with having to accept permanent closure of our brick and mortar location.”

The cafe, which opened in January 2017, offered a place for children 6 years and older to play, while parents and guardians sipped coffee and tea in the cafe space.

Nguyen called the decision to close “heartbreaking.”

“Like all of you, we wish this pandemic would end and we can return to our prior “normal”, but this is our new heart-breaking reality,” she wrote. “We can only reflect on the memories we’ve shared with all of you in our quaint playcafe and hope that you felt, for a moment in time, we tried our best to package fun and deliver it with love.”

City Owlets will still offer offsite event services for design, staging, catering and entertainment — as well as its classes at schools and daycares, Nguyen said in a statement to customers.

Linda Nguyen, the founder of City Owlets Play Cafe with her family in the space (City Owlets)

email the author: [email protected]

4 Comments

Click for Comments 
S

So by ending it you’re saying it’s ok to risk and lose more lives..perhaps we should’ve never shut down at all, maybe then even the nice owners of this business could’ve contracted COVID and had bigger consequences to deal with, such as no longer being alive to watch their own kids grow up.

Reply
Young Kim

So sad to read this news. It may be just another closing to a lot of people but this represents everything the owners did to get this place up and running. It’s a tragic loss.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the big game in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Long Island City teen sentenced in fatal shooting of ‘beloved’ school teacher at Queensbridge Houses in 2020: DA

A Long Island City man on Friday, Jan. 28, was sentenced to 19 years in prison for the 2020 fatal shooting of a public school social studies teacher who was out walking his dog when he was caught in the crossfire during a confrontation between gang rivals in broad daylight, just blocks from his home, according to Queens District Attorney’s office.

Ike Ford, 19, of 12th Street, in Long Island City, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the first degree before Queens Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Holder. The teacher, George Rosa, 53, was shot in his abdomen by a stray bullet fired by Ford, who was just 17 years old at the time of the shooting but was sentenced as an adult given the severity of the crime, according to Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.

LaGuardia Community College President Kenneth Adams explained that the school lost nearly a quarter of its students at the height of the pandemic due to the economic effects of the lockdown on low-income Queens households.

BP launches new advisory panel for youth to become civically engaged in the future of Queens

In an effort to get more young people involved in civics, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards has created a new advisory panel known as the Youth and Young Adult Council to introduce the “youngest and fiercest” community advocates to both community service and organization.

Members of the advisory body will advocate concerns through means of community engagement by participating in one of two cohorts. The first will be made up of high school representatives between the ages of 13 and 17, while the second cohort will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 18 and 25.