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Hunters Point South Waterfront Park opened last Tuesday

Aug. 26, 2013 By Christian Murray

The New York City Parks Department opened a 5 ½ acre waterfront park near Borden Avenue last Tuesday.

The park, which is called Hunters Point South Waterfront Park, includes a large lawn, a new dog run, playground equipment and dedicated bicycle lanes.

The 5 ½ park will be expanded another 6 acres when the park goes all the way down to Newtown Creek.

The city will officially have a ribbon cutting on Wednesday at 10 am.

The park is part of the Hunters Point South development, which will include 5,000 units of affordable housing.

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26 Comments

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LICer

We should punish the pets not owners! Give pets that pee or poop on grass death penalty by court is best way to stop these selfish owners!!!!! End of the story.

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Anonymous

I think there needs to be some kind of a registration system in the buildings in LIC where the dog owners live. As part of a lease, dog owners should have to to responsible for obeying all laws re: their pets on the public lands. If they are caught letting their dogs pee or poop on state or city property, they could face penalties or even eviction if they are guilty of multiple infractions. Voluntary codes of conduct haven’t worked, and the police just don’t hand out sufficient fines (or any?). Hit the offenders where it hurts and maybe they would finally obey the law.

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Anonymous

Do you really think that there would be no dog pee or poop on grassy areas if only owners knew the rules?

Guys, I admire your civil tone, but people who allow their pets to defile our neighborhood are not going to be have their behavior changed by a bunch of signs and posted warnings. The problem with the offending dog owners is with them, and their laziness and selfishness. No sign will ever cure that.

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Mary

Not all dog owners know the rules when at a public park, I didn’t know dogs were not allowed in ball fields either until today. So I agree, specific signs can only help! Who can we speak to and what can we do to make this happen?

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Mark

and p.s. – I am starting to like this blog more and more. It has a much more civil and solutions-oriented tone.

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Mark

While a bit ambiguous, I would hope that the below three points would sum things up for people with common sense, but agree that some more specific signs, if possible, would not be a bad thing …

“You must pick up after your dog and dispose of the waste in containers provided throughout the park. Remember: Urine damages the grass and trees, and people use the park for picnicking and sunbathing.”

“With good stewardship and courtesy, you can play a role in keeping parks clean, safe, and beautiful”

“No unleashed dogs are allowed on the sand at all New York City beaches. Leashed dogs are allowed on the boardwalk/promenade at Orchard Beach, Coney Island, Brighton, Midland, South, and Manhattan Beaches.”

The problem is that common sense doesn’t always apply in a large city … which is what ultimately leads to buildings, parks, and any other communal living spaces to implement what ends up seeming like overly strict rules.

This brings me back to my point about self-enforcement. If people can’t use common sense then it helps if the public points out their wrongs: “excuse me, but please don’t let your dog pee in the sand” or “please consider that people lay on the grass and sunbathe, it’s fine for your dog to lie with you on your blanket, but please don’t walk them and let them pee here”.

“Dog runs are large, fenced-in areas for dogs to exercise unleashed. Created with the expertise of a Parks Department landscape architect and volunteers, the runs encourage play while supplying good drainage, safe lighting, and healthy plantings.”

Unfortunately it seems like people with common sense are few and far between these days, but I’d like to hope that it really is a few bad apples and that if the majority pin points and responds to them that it might actually help…

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lliicc

Okay, I re-read the NYC parks regulations on dogs and it says:

“Dogs are never allowed in playgrounds, zoos,
swimming pools/facilities, bathing areas/
beaches (see park website for off-season
exceptions), fountains, ballfields, or on
basketball/handball/tennis courts. ”

So, I would say that the “artificial turf” is off-limits and if you consider the sand area a “beach” than dogs aren’t allowed there either.

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Mary

I don’t think there are signs now, but I hope they will soon. We can SAY SOMETHING when we see animal waste not being picked up though.

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Mary

Agreed Mark, we as a community should help enforce what logically should not be. The park is huge and the city can not monitor every spot so if we wish to maintain a beautiful park we as a community need do our part. SAY SOMETHING if you see owners not picking up after their dogs! people littering, kids skateboarding and doing tricks on the chairs etc…

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lliicc

Mark

– one clarification, there will be 3 public dog runs and 1 pseudo-public dog run – the new rental on 4545 blvd will have a really nice open area and a *nice dog run*. So yes, lots of fun for dog lovers.

I like the idea of high rises providing their own amenities for kids and dogs and parking. Sounds like a nice solution versus everyone fighting.

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Anonymous

There’s a reason why things get banned: it’s because there will always be sufficient number of idiots who are selfish and mess things up for everyone else.

That’s why we have a blanket ban on smoking in indoor spaces and restaurants, for example. We all heard arguments in favor of carving exceptions to that rule. Remember how great it worked in your office when they set up special “smoking lounges”? Fortunately, the city banned all inside smoking because once you open the door to the “considerate smokers” (or “respectful dog owners”), you allow the pigs to abuse the system and ruin it for all of us.

So, I say, keep all dogs out of green spaces intended for use by the general public. Dogs should ONLY be allowed on sidewalks and specially designated dog runs. PERIOD. If you can’t handle that, get a cat.

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Mark

Yeah, come on with the complaining Jane … there is now another dog run, which brings us to two in a relatively small area (actually 3 with Murray Park). Compared to the rest of the city I’d say that there is now relatively little shlepping involved to get to a dog run in LIC.

The area that should be most enforced is the new “beach” area. I’ve seen kids playing in it and articles mentioning it will be used for volleyball too … not exactly the kind of area that you want dogs pissing and crapping in, yet even with a new dog run right next to it you see people going out of their way to let their dogs in the sand/grass, right next to kids digging in it, and letting them do their business. Actually, isn’t that why they had to close the now overgrown park on 48th? Another area impacted by disrespectful owners.

I’ve steered clear of the dog banter and wondered why it was such a big deal to keep them out of the other parks, but seeing this just reinforces the argument to keep them out. We keep talking about opening new dog runs as the solution … now we have another run and people still let their dogs walk right around it and piss in areas that are intended for people to play/lay in … nothing against dogs, I wouldn’t want humans taking a crap in the sand either.

I agree with the above … dogs should be able to walk and do their business on the paved paths … and they can run and play in the dog runs all they want. Dogs can’t judge whether or not it is ok to piss and crap on grass and sand areas, otherwise I would say let them play with the rest of us humans. So why don’t you throw a diaper on your dog, then I would be happy to let them share the same space as kids (and even be compared to them) … or if we look at it the other way around, we could just take kids diapers off and let them crap outside of your door and on the places you like to sit/step.

Let’s wake up to the fact that the city won’t clean up after us. Neither will the community. At the end of the day not being respectful owners does ruin it for everyone (dog owners and non-dog owners). Unfortunately, it seems like the only way to avoid parks being shut down (due to lack of clean-up budget) or becoming neglected/overgrown, is not to allow dogs — and that brings us right back to where we started.

We should all make a point to call people out when we see them a) not cleaning up after their pets b) letting them into areas where they logically should not be — the city won’t enforce, they’ll just shut down or let it decay, so if we don’t want restrictions on dogs, then we’ll have to self-enforce. If we can’t self-enforce, then dogs should not be allowed. At least that’s how I see it.

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lliicc

Jane – the new park is very dog friendly with wide boulevards and a new dog run. There’s also a new large dog run for the 4545 Center Blvd rental as well. LIC is very dog friendly, so it’s unclear what you mean.

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Jane

Tons of dogs in the area and plenty of space in that park. Architechts should have planned the design layout better with this in mind since most residents are unlikely to shlepp over to dog run on Vernon Blvd particularly during extreme weather.

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Jane

Tons of dogs in this area and plenty of space – architects should have designed park with this in mind since unlikely residents will shlepp over to the dog run on vernon blvd

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lic lover

The new park is terrific! Please everyone keep it clean and beautiful, and if it’s dirty try to help pick up.

In terms of south of the Ferry, there is currently a wild forest sitting on a terrific hill that overlooks the river.

I am advocating that we ask the Parks department to keep as much of that untouched as they develop Phase 2.

All the best.

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Mary

On the other side of Center Blvd where the other field is, they had a small grass seating area that was off limit to dogs. Last summer I saw people bring there dog to that small area of grass to do their business and the grass is now yellow/dead and pretty disgusting. The no dogs sign is gone and that area is now unkept and unpleasant to go near. I think the main thing is to not only put signs up on green areas where dog urine can ruin the landscape but we also need people to re-enforce the rules. I hope this new park will keep it’s beauty for a very long time!

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r185

As a dog owner I think all paved areas should be ok for dogs and only designated unpaved areas OK. That way (assuming everyone follows the rules) you can lay on the grass and not have to worry, but the dog still has a place to do what dogs do when outside.

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InAPerfectWorld

From my home I have the blessing to look at these glorious parks and piers. It really brings out the nicest parts of humanity….

That being said, there are quite a few (albeit a small percentage), that do ruin it for the rest by not picking up after their dogs OR themselves. It is astounding how much trash/recycling that gets tossed to the ground just inches from the numerous garbage bins.

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Anonymous

dogs should be banned on the grass and turf. Unfortunately, 10% of the dog owners ruin it for all.

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Mary

Love the new park and hope it stays beautiful…

I saw many people play with their dogs on the greens and no harm in that, until the dog had to “go”. Even as a dog owner myself, I feel the greens should be off limit to dogs, just to preserve the beautiful grass and smell.

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