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5-story building going up on Vernon Blvd

Vernon Blvd construction

Sept. 16, 2014 Staff Report

Construction has started on a 5-story, 15-unit residential building on Vernon Boulevard, according to Department of Building records.

In the past week, a construction fence has gone up around the periphery of the 49-18 Vernon Blvd property, which is currently a vacant lot door next to Butcher Gourmet Deli.

The owner of Butcher Gourmet Deli has a large ownership interest in the new development. However, he did not want to elaborate.

The Dept. of Building filing states that it will be a mixed use property, indicating that it will include ground-floor retail space.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

17 Comments

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Danny

The construction fence came down late last week, and now there are cars back in the lot. Anybody know what happened?

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Dana

Yes, I screamed. I wrote, took pictures, contacted 311 for lack of posted permits, also wrote Councilman Van Bramer’s office. The Counciman came through.
Proactive, people. Violation 1, no Dept. Of Buildings signs. Two, pedestrian safety. That has got to be top priority. Three, being human to our beloved ( ok, needed and very respected) police precinct. The officers put in signed parking spaces, but they gave them up the day after the criminally negligent fence went up, for a pedestrian safety barrier.
Let’s be active, folks.

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Lic fan

Since the owner of the deli next door has a stake in the project, maybe the deli will get cleaned up and not look like a dump. What goes on upstairs from the deli?

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Anonymous

I’m sure the building/owner has to file permits and drawings to show where the site fence is supposed to go.
It is odd that a project can block off a public sidewalk and not be required to put a pedestrian walk adjacent – including cones and concrete barricades and signs. I don’t remember there being any signs.
A little detective work should bring out the truth.

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Time's Up

LIC Post, youi fail to mention that the wall that “has gone up around the periphery” in fact blocks the entire fuckin sidewalk!

If you walk east from the water on 50th Ave the sidewalk comes to an abrupt end once you pass the precinct.

Is that legal LIC Post? Can you do a little work and find an answer? I mean, this isn’t Watergate or anything. The answers should be readily obtainable.

Between the cop cars taking up all of the north sidewalk and private contractor vehicles taking up the south side, this block has always been a mess. Now it was taken to another level with this bullshit.

I know John hears me. Well, John and others – complain! Not just here. Call Van Bramer and 311.

Let’s put aside whether the cops have the right to block that sidewalk. There’s no way that the private businesses do. I wonder if the people who won’t allow bars to have open backyards bitch about this too. This is 100x worse.

The businesses wouldn’t get away with this if it weren’t for the cops’ complicity. Fuck them. As usual, they do whatever the fuck they wanna do and have nothing but contempt for those they’re supposed to serve.

So, again, LIC Post – there’s a story here. Please tell your loyal readers how this wall is supposed to be legal and you can get bonus points for showing the consistently-blocked southern sidewalk and asking the 108 why they allow it.

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thelinebetweengoodandevil

I say keep the cars there, it’s a deterrent to all those people who want to drink and drive at least it should be. Also the 108 is not to blame, the blame needs to the Queens DA office since they are the only ones that can release the vehicle to the pound or registered owner.

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5th Street

I think I read somewhere that the first floor of the plumber’s union might be doctors’ offices, which is kind of weird because if someone needed to hop out of work (in Manhattan) this would be far away. What the area needs are businesses that cater to after work services, such as a Pilates / MMA / cross fit gym, a tailor, a Chinese massage studio, a car wash/oil change place, another hair salon/barber, a daycare, etc. We have to accept that LIC is a ghost town during work hours and doesn’t have the foot traffic to support retail and, to an extent, restaurants (no lunch business).

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Day LICer

There are people in LIC during the day and not everyone goes into Manhattan, so a decent doctor’s office with consistent hours would be a welcome addition! There are people eating, shopping and spending time in our neighborhood throughout the day. Neighborhood has plenty of places to get a massage, work out studios, day cares and hair salons. I hope you are joking when you consider those actual needs for the neighborhood.

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LIC_Dude

The building on 5th is going to be a plumber’s union meeting hall or something like that.

Really nice re-design, I must say. Makes it look like DUMBO to me.

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Stan

Does anyone know what is being built on 5th St between 50-51st Ave? It was enclosed in white plastic for a long time, and seems to be a commercial space. A Trader Joe’s??!!

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John

How convenient for the developers, again at the expense of pedestrians. Now that the north side of the street is blocked by plywood fencing, and the south side of the street is consistently blocked by police and commercial vehicles parking on the sidewalk (frequently right up to the buildings) the many pedestrians walking up 50th to the subway can walk right out on the street. What fun to take our lives in our hands just because whoever is supposed to be “responsible” for street safety in LIC is MIA. Can’t wait until the first stroller or child or wheelchair is struck by a car and then the finger-pointing can begin.

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Question about the site

Here, her. Get rid of that parking lot.

But I always thought that the reason there was never any development on that corner (which used to be the trolley depot back in the old days) was that the MTA owns an easment there because it wouldn’t be possible to dig without interfering with the No. 7 station. Does anyone know more about this?

The police station is a NYC landmark. It would be a travesty to see a piece of ugly crap abut that gracious building.

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Ro

Hopefully this new building will deter the 108 from parking mangled cars on that corner which make our neighborhood look like a junkyard right when you get of the 7 train. I also hope that the developers also decide to hire a half decent architect that can build something attractive and not a brick box or some cheap copy of classical architecture. This is a very prominent corner in or neighborhood, crossing my fingers they make good use of it.

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Anonymous

No Joke.
Good news that the corner is going to get cleaned up.
No more cars on the sidewalk…no more ugly chain link fence when you first get off the train.
Hopefully a nice building with a retail space to bring value to the community.

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