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Sports-themed restaurant likely to open on Vernon Blvd

Jan. 12, 2017 By Christian Murray

A new operator is planning to take over Tutti Matti—formerly known as Testaccio–and convert the space into a sports-themed restaurant.

The new company, called 47 Thirty LLC, plans to open the 47-30 Vernon Blvd venue with approximately 12 TVs—plus a large screen—and offer an extensive menu. The kitchen is large so there will be a focus on food.

The operators want to keep the establishment open until 1 am Sunday-Thursday, and 2 am on Fridays and Saturdays, according to a representative who spoke at Community Board 2’s City Services & Public Safety Committee last night.

The operators, who insisted they were opening a “sports-themed restaurant,” went before the board in their quest for a liquor license. The new operators will take over Tutti Matti once all their paper work is in order.

Pat O’Brien, chair of the City Services & Public Safety Committee, said that the committee was unable to render a decision at this time. He said that Hunters Point residents should be able to get a better understanding of the application so they can weigh in on it first.

“When we hear restaurant with a sports theme, we think sports bar,” O’Brien said. “That is ok but it attracts a certain exuberance…and we have to scrutinize it a little more since it is not the same as a refined French restaurant that closes at 10:30 pm.”

O’Brien said the location is surrounded by residents. “You may be aware or may not be aware but there is a core group of residents along Vernon Blvd that think we have way too many bars and restaurants,” he said, adding that “for that reason we are sensitive to their concerns.”

The board plans to hold a public meeting in Hunters Point about the proposed “sports-themed restaurant.” The meeting is is likely to take place in early February. The board is likely to make a decision at that time.

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Tutti Matti Cucina Italiana & Pizza LIC

The Tutti Matti team would like to let our community know that we are still here! The rumor of us closing or leaving this wonderful community was not and is not true. There have been many bumps in the road, but we would not disappoint in taking away your favorite authentic Italian cuisine! With that said, please come on in and enjoy our brand new happy hour specials as well as the many additions to our menu. We will soon be having many fun and delicious events coming up this summer that we hope you can join us for! We hope to see you all very soon!

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Mister Charlie

And you all have way too much time on your hands with these long back and forth posts. It’s clear you’re all just unemployed hipsters.

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Fred

Thanks Hunterspointman.

I hadn’t heard the basement chat story before, can see how some residents feel betrayed. More importantly, seems like history is repeating itself. It feels like LIC is constantly building without any oversight and/or insight from todays residents.

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Anonymous

I think anyone willing to take a risk and open any business in LIC should be encouraged-The rents are high and most of the people that go out and spend money live on waterfront-hence why those places like SHI and Cantina are always packed-They don’t walk to Vernon as quickly as right out their door. I love Tutti and go probably 1x/week but they are struggling-it’s hard for someone offering really quality fare to draw a crowd because the price point gets a bit higher.

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hunterspointman

You missed the whole point Frank. I am not “trying” to stop anything. All I tried to do was give examples of how all this has impacted generational families in a negative way. But you decided to attack me personally.
Uncalled for and bratty. You apparently represent the worst of the new invasion.

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Anonymous

Seems like a high-class problem for the generational families, who have had all the advantages! You’re talking about the major blvd in town – it’s not supposed to be quiet. I welcome more business investment in the neighborhood. To echo the other comment – hard earned dollars are put at risk.

What % of the total population are the generational families? Do you think it’s fair to dictate the public business composition? The population has morphed from younger folks who have stayed behind and now have children. They are invested in the neighborhood and want to see the best for it – more schools, services, etc. Perhaps, we younger folks are more open minded.

Your comment “invasion” sums it up, and the new population is invading *your* neighborhood. Seems like you want a wall too? This is NYC, if you want something static, move out to the burbs.

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hunterspointman

I said invaders as a counterpoint to frank for summing up my concerns by telling me if i don’t like it I should move. Im 37, Hardly a cranky old fart. I just have manners and respect to those who came before me. p.s.I never said “my” neighborhood. Learn how to paraphrase correctly. Im sure Siri could help you with that.

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Frank

Ah, the veiled iHipster allusion…such a fail. Next time, learn what Siri is before embarrassing yourself. And, yes, feel free to move if you don’t like the neighborhood. I imagine you don’t own the bulk of Hunterspoint, so your opinion of the changes is fairly irrelevant.

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Hunterspointman

Sociopath: a person with a personality disorder manifesting itself in extreme antisocial attitudes and behavior and a lack of conscience.(i.e,. Frank)

Frank

Hunterspointman, when you resort to calling people sociopaths, you have lost the argument (and any sense of self respect). Is it because you are just rubbed the wrong way when someone says your opinion is irrelevant? Well, too bad. Sorry if reality is so tough for you…try crawling under your bed and staying in a fetal position.

hunterspointman

Frank, Your incapable of having a rational argument, thus the diagnosis. You choose to throw rocks instead of a valid, thought out counterpoint. I understand, it’s because you cant control yourself. It’s a dead giveaway. I like a lot of my new neighbors, the ones that contribute something new, fresh and exciting. Those who revere history and assimilate accordingly. ( I bet if you moved to another country you wouldn’t feel obligated to learn the customs or language either) Your arrogance is your insecurity on display..So, We’ll pass on the likes of you. Your just a bully with nothing to bring to the table but loathsome, juvenile pablum.

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Frank

Obviously reading comprehension is not one of your strong suits. What is so difficult about the idea that neighborhoods change and people who move into a neighborhood have zero obligation to reverently kowtow to the existing residents (HINT: this is my point)? They pay their rent/mortgage and are free to do what they want without getting the approval of blowhard d-bags like yourself. Is that really so difficult to comprehend? Are the old residents of Hunterspoint a long lost tribe, culturally separate from the rest of New York? Get over your provincial self.

Here is the difference between this neighborhood and a foreign country – the old residents are continuously being diluted by the new residents. Their time of dominating the culture of the neighborhood is over, no matter how much they kick and scream. Someone moving to a new country is not going to have that effect, although waves of immigrants can, e.g., immigration to the US over the past 150 have changed American culture. I have lived in other countries and speak 6 language with varying levels of fluency, because it was necessary to function in these countries. I hardly feel the need to learn Whinerese to be able to speak to you in your native tongue.

Make sense, or do I need to break out the puppets to help you understand?

hunterspointman

My bad. I didn’t realize I was dealing with a superior intellect. Of course you speak 6 languages, have traveled and lived throughout the world and are a master of socioeconomics. Please forgive my feeble attempt to illustrate the impact the recent building boom has had on useless morons like myself. I guess we were just comfortable in our provinciality ( is that a word?) How do you say that in German? I’d look it up, but me no read so good. So thank you for a the last few days. It was a real learning experience to be trolled by someone so deft at dehumanization. I gather your also fun at parties.

Frank

Your fragile ego is on display again. The fact that I speak 6 languages was to address you suggestion that I would not learn a local language if I lived in another culture. I don’t think that confers any special status on me. Your are starting to sound like Trump’s Twitter feed, jumping from rant to rant forgetting what you said before.

To answer your question, the word you are looking for is Provinzlertum, but I think the word Leibeigener is perhaps a better description for your perspective. I imagine you too are fun at parties, at least the ones where someone had requested a clown show up.

Daniella K.

Hunterspoint man, I’d stay clear of that creep. Forget about humor or sarcasm, that is totally lost on someone with that kind of psychosis. Pathetic and likely dangerous.

Anonymous

The reason for concern is a few bad operators like the standing room that disrupts the whole block. We hear them across the street. Ambulances taking drugged out folks away at 2 and 3 in the morning. People aren’t apposed to a well run business. Just people that are going to make trouble in the neighborhood are of concern.

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Hunterspointman

Whiney is not exactly the word I’d use to describe people who have lived in the area for their lifetimes. There is a certain amount of distain associated with long time long island city residents who are worried about this so called progress. It’s very simple. We have been bamboozled. When all this redevelopment started with talks in St. Mary’s basement in the late 90’s, we were told a story. That Story was this: We would like to develop the waterfront, make a park and a library. We’d also like to build 6 tasteful residential building along the waterfront and incorporate them into the long storied historical working class, manufacturing neighborhood. All the players were there. The mayors office, the local congressman, The Queensborough President. All saying how wonderful it would be for ALL of us. Well, flash forward 17 years. We now live in a canyon of skyscrapers totally blocking out the skyline. We have a nail salons everywhere. On Vernon and 47th, there are 4 realtors and two more on the next block. As for bars? We have enough of them too. Nightly when I’m trying to find a parking space within 8 blocks of my home, I cant. Because all the residents who have cars in the new buildings don’t want to pay the exorbitant monthly rental fees. So they park down by us, the whiners. On a weekly basis I see at least groups of girls vomiting on vernon blvd in mini’s and high heels waiting for their uber.( its January) The amount of sanitation trucks that roam the streets all night cause major sleeping issues while they ignore traffic lights and crash, bang and smash their way through this once sleepy family neighborhood. Have a conversation with friends who have small children next to the 24hr/ weed pickup spot dunkin donuts. They’ll spin tales of all night racket and blaring hip/hop from blacked out windowed cars and from arguments erupting at 4 a.m. So yeah, we need a 2 a.m. “sports bar” or whatever misleading term they’re using to conceal it’s actual incarnation. This all happened too fast and without any true inclusion from the people who always cared about Hunterspoint. They came, they bulldozed and dictated. So be a little more respectful when you mention us. We’re not whining, we’re just really sick of being marginalized.

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Frank

Wow…that was a long whine. You are being marginalized because you are trying to prevent the neighborhood from developing the way that most residents want (as indicated by how their money is being spent). Or should we freeze Hunterspoint in time just for you? Neighborhoods change, especially when lots of new people move in with different likes and dislikes. They owe you nothing. If you don’t like it, then move. Most are sick of hearing your longing for the good old days.

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hunterspointman

You missed the whole point. I’m not “trying” to stop anything.I just pointed out the things that went wrong with the plan and its effects on nice people who have called this home for generations. But you resorted to being nasty to me personally. Uncalled for and bratty.

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Frank

Go re-read you post. It is one long, carmudgeonly complaint. It reeks of wanting to stop change (I assume you want to stop the changes you complained about at such great length). With your need for “respect” (because, you know, you lived here for a while – a low bar indeed) and feelings of being marginalized (no one even needed to ask your opinion – it was a courtesy), you strike me as a fairly thin-skinned, fragile individual. So be a good invadee and grumble to yourself and those few like-minded residents left, perhaps MRLIC. The rest of the neighborhood is going in a different, better direction.

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Astoria Resident

I thought hunterspointman was being very thoughtful in his post. The long time residents of LIC were sold a bag of goods. You cannot begin to image what a sleepy non-city neighborhood it used to be. No, they can’t do anything about it, times do change, but to take an insensitive ‘tough shit’ attitude speaks volumes about you. Such a narcissistic disrespectful man. I was going to say ‘generation’ but I don’t broad brush.

Frank

Pfft…time to join the real world, Astoria Resident. It is not narcissism to recognize that you cannot change many things and one should learn to accept that. All these narcissistic old timers strut around like they are God’s gift to the neighborhood and their little Garden of Eden is being besmirched by these vile new people who **gasp** are different and already have a network of friends who don’t live in shouting distance! Screw them…living somewhere does not automatically confer respect. The sooner this neighborhood can unload such tripe, the better. Maybe we could even allow restaurants to have outdoor seating in their backyards.

Ms Yna

Your big mouth spouts because you moved here looking to impart our way of life (hipster) on people who disagree with you. Go back to jersey.

Anonymous

Longtime residents get over yourselves. LIC was bound for change, and your resistance would have been futile. Do you think basement town hall meetings were going to thwart billions of investment?

So a couple of extra of nail salons, real estate offices and bars exist for now but the market will dictate what businesses survive. The one next to Halstead looks like it shuttered. Having more businesses is better than a handful of Italian restaurants only. Where did you shop for grocery before? Food Cellar, Key Food, Duane Reade, etc. only came because the high rises went up. Why don’t you go back further and mention how desolate the neighborhood was 30 years ago?

Your home prices have soared! If you don’t like the neighborhood, sell and cash out your million dollar houses. And if you didn’t buy when houses were dirt cheap, tough luck and that’s on you. The writing was on the wall for many many years.

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Daniella K.

Sure I can go back 30 years. On vernon we had an associated supermarket. Run by David and Marsha. Closed because greedy landlords decided they could get triple rent. Next time you seamless thai food just know that Tuk tuk was a 100 year old hardware store run by your least favorite term ” a generational family” we also had Johns Italian grocery where you could get fresh Mozzarella and specialities for 1/4 of the price you get at food cellar, a place that is so insanely expensive whole foods is Costco in comparison. Reading these posts, I can see that most of the newer residents feels as if they steered their sailing ships into the great unknown and discovered an uncharted land and brought civilization to the savages. It very simple. When you come in “en masse” ( and this happened VERY fast) to an already established area you should at the very least try to be respectful of the people who live here. I don’t see that happening especially in these vitriolic posts from Frank and Anonymous. All that guy ( hunterspointman) did was point out some things that were disconcerting. Oh, and yeah. We DID have decision power in the beginning. I was there for much of it in the basement of Saint Mary’s in 1997/98. City council wanted to rezone, allowing your high rises to be built. We agreed because at the time we didn’t know people like frank would come and claim it as their own.

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Anonymous

I wouldn’t waste your breath, Daniela. Many new people in LIC just don’t get it. They never lived in a city neighborhood, so they have nothing to judge it on. I suppose if you come from rural China or Topeka or the Russian steppes, then what we have in LIC right now is down right dreamy. The place looks better, but it has no gutsiness, no weirdness.

I’m not at all opposed to change. I loved it when the wave of artists came to LIC in the late 70s and 1980s — now that’s the kind of change I could get behind. But that type of energy and edge that New York neighborhoods used to boast is gone. Now we have just a bunch of boring, self-involved twits with office jobs walking around. It’s like a bad episode of The Prisoner. In LIC today, I often feel like I returned to my apartment and someone went in and threw out all my old, comfortable, crappy furniture and replaced it with sleek new stuff I hate.

What I learned is that dumping an ever-evolving shitload of restaurants, delis and nail salons is not a substitute for a cohesive neighborhood that feels like home. I feel so alienated in this area today, with the life sucked out of it by a bunch of hulking and tacky buildings. The streets, especially near the river, are an anonymous blur of blank-faced people who don’t know you from Adam.

What’s to like about it? I accept it, because I live here and need to stay here. And, yes, I do like some of the new businesses and eat and drink there, and I’ve met a few decent people. But their contributions don’t make up for the enormous emotional hole this place has today. LIC today proves that you can have all the centrally planned money in the world sunk into the place and it will never feel like home.

I don’t mean to insult anyone individually, and I guess my comments will inspire people like Frank to spew some angry comments. I’m just speaking the truth as I see it.

Frank

Or maybe Anonymous, these new people live here but have lives and friends that are in many other neighborhoods and cities. I have met plenty of folks here I have become friends with. If I had not, well, there is the subway to hang out with other people.

It is interesting – there was an editorial in the WSJ that suggested that part of the anti-globalist resentment that is driving things like Brexit and Trump is because people oriented to globalism are not tied to a specific locale for their social support and identity. The idea that a globalist would leave their home for a modestly better deal or not identify with their neighborhood is plain weird to the traditionalist. The same goes for looking at a neighborhood as an assortment of features and up or down sides to be continuously evaluated and judged. Certainly the old vs new residents of Hunterspoint are an interesting study of this hypothesis albeit a bit forced and oversimplified. Guess which ones are the mammals and which are the dinosaurs in this model. Time to evolve.

And, don’t delude yourself into thinking you ever had power in this. The money was there and wanted to develop the area. “Involving” the community was simply the most cost effective way to get it done. Once the train started to roll, your involvement was no longer useful. Sorry, to burst your bubble, but pumping up the old residents’ ego was just a cost and time saving measure. Just look how bought out JVB is nowadays.

Gman

Wow that was great post. It really expresses feelings of all the original Long Island cityites. So much was promised to us but so little materialized. Ed Sadowski made sure he got a beautiful apartment in city lights since he was a politician and friend of the developer spac since he was a politician and friend of the developer but the longtime residents were frozen out of the building.of the buildinglights. I left 10 years ago, so my house nine years ago and haven’t regretted it one bit Hunterspoint has become way too crowded

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Phil MaCrackin

Anonymous and Frank, spoken like two hipster asshats who are not real New Yorkers and understand what neighborhoods and neighbors mean. You would rather pay 8 dollars for a shitty latte at some overpriced coffee bar than goto a place owned by a local who might treat you like family. The old school locals aren’t against change or new places, they’re against being priced out of the places they call home. If you don’t like the old timers of the neighborhood, than maybe it’s you who should move, take you and your 4 roommates sharing a two bedroom and go back to the Midwest.

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Frank

Sorry Phil…born and raised in New York City. If you have actually lived in the City for any decent amount of time (which I doubt), you would know that change often comes with increasing prices and people moving in and out of neighborhoods. And, yes, usually those who are displaced whine about the injustice of their landlords actually charging rent at a market rate (unless you are one of those rent control parasites), mainly because they fear the unknown.

Here is a hint for you about staying in the place you call home: buy or bye. Or whine like a little b****.

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brooklynmc

FYI: NYC as a whole is going through gentrification. Almost every single neighborhood has old timers being forced out. You know why? That is life. That is progress. That is growth. There are plenty of places where tomorrow will be just like today. Like, the midwest, otherwise known as the rustbelt. Time has stopped. I grew up in Westport, Ct. It was a very nice middle class town with mom and pop stores. Today it is a very expensive NYC suburb with high end shopping that I will never be able to afford. Oh well.

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Anonymous

I gotta tell you. I wish you were around years ago and delivered this little monologue outside Branca’s. Your Westport ass would have been stuffed inside your Topsiders and you’d be sent on your merry way.

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brooklynmc

Stai zitto! I don’t own topsiders. Being a tough guy is for high school kids and idiots.

Huh 2

Anonymous # 3 wtf? PJs has 10 TV’s (some small), Corner Bistro has 4, and Gantry has a few. There are others also.
All within 2 blocks on Vernon.

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Anonymous

While Tutti / Testaccio was my favorite Italian joint, LIC was way too many Italian restaurants! I welcome the change and eventual change to Vernon Blvd, which is a commercial strip and not intended to stay humdrum.

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Ginger the Pirate

Great food, but not surprised. It’s a big space and no one went past the bar.

We need a sports bar, can the NIMBYs in the hood just chill.

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Drumpf Lover

OMG, Pat O’Brian is so stupid! Corner Bistro is a sports bar too but we don’t see any sort of “exuberant” behavior outside of that establishment. Walk past Manettas on a Friday or Saturday night and you will see much rowdier behavior there (as well as all those annoying, illegally parked cars all around the surrounding streets). Also, insinuating that a “…refined French Restaurant…that closes at 10:30…” is more preferable to a sports bar makes me want to punch this guy in the nut sack. Businesses open to cater to the demographics of the hood. A sports bar would do much better than a refined French place.

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Chiefs

This is fantastic news! LIC is baron when it comes to sports bars. Hopefully this inspires more sports bars and less Ramen places.

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Gman

There once was a sports bar in Long Island city where Dominis hook is now located. It lasted for a few years but was ahead of its time. Hope you enjoy this new establishment

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Paul K.

I don’t understand the pushback on an establishment earmarked for food and drink planning to serve food and drink and … show sports on TVs.

Are we going to scrutinize menus? Are chicken wings or loaded fries a threat to the way of life for the “core group of residents along Vernon Blvd.”?

How ’bout no more than three baseball games on a time during the summer and absolutely no NBA after 11 p.m.? We don’t want a repeat of all those NYC neighborhoods (home to more pro sports teams than any city in America) ravaged by the presence of fans socializing around a game.

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Anonymous

Tutti Matti was my favorite Italian restaurant in the neighborhood, but I am excited about a sports themed restaurant. I wish this sports restaurant was going in the old Open Door location. I think that layout is better for a sports restaurant.

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Hater

IMO: Pat O’Brien is pretty worthless at this point… LIC – especially Hunters Point does need some semblance of diversity, and deserves to cater to the younger demographic that will ultimately takeover. I have nothing to do with this venture, but I have seen the likes of Pat O’Brien and others stunt growth with their own ideals in the forefront.

Give people a chance and stop being such a snotty bag of douche.

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Frank

Jon hit the nail on the head. That “core group of residents” are the same whiny turds who demand that the main commercial street in the area be like a residential side street and have an unusual aversion to letting restaurants use their outdoor space. They are speed bumps to the inevitable improvement of the area.

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Astoria Resident

Whiney turds. Nice way to talk about people who simply are resistant to change. Be patient with the elderly for time stops for no one.

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Jon

Given the new business’s focus on sports-themed “restaurant” rather than “sports bar,” I’m pretty sure they are well aware of the, “core group of residents along Vernon Blvd” who want everything to remain as it was in 1960, Pat.

That being said, Tutti Matti has good food, Testaccio did too. The glut of Italian restaurants in the area means something has to give though and this place hasn’t been able to sustain itself for some reason. However, this is not the right location for a sports bar, or a “sports-themed restaurant,” either. I can’t see it working out well there.

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Anonymous

Why? If there is one thing LIC is missing, it’s a sports bar. Every place has 1-2 TVs maximum and there is nowhere good to go to watch Sunday Football or baseball games. This will be a welcome addition.

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Phil MaCrackin

P.J. Leahy’s sucks the same moron that owns this place, owns Rocky McBrides and is Part owner of Shillelagh bar. Leahy’s has lots of cops in it due to the 108 right there but the other two always have drunk assholes in them and people always doing coke in the bathroom or smoking weed outside. I wouldn’t want to frequent anyplace where the owner lets shit like that go on at any of his establishments and doesn’t care about the neighbors having to deal with these morons in front of their residences. Screw P.J. Leahy’s.

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Kendra

There’s a killer oyster deal happy hour every Thursday at BLVD Wine Bar on Center Blvd. $1 oysters… fantastic

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Marge

Yeah but Tutti Matti had $1 oysters Thurs-Sun from 5pm to closing…. and recently expanded it to every day…

That can’t be beat :'(

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GiorgioLIC

I love Tutti Matti. It’s the only authentic Italian restaurant in the neighborhood.I always got a warm greeting and a nice chat in Italiano from Raffaele. But I knew something was up when I saw they’d taken off some of the Sicilian specialties (like maccheroncini allo stretto) and replaced them with Italian American cliches (“chicken parm”). Manetta’s is good and reliable, if not inspired, Manducatis (both places) are terrible (why people go to either is beyond me), and Brutta Via (AKA Bella Via) kills you with garlic. So my favorite neighborhood place is going to be replaced by a sports bar/restaurant. Sorry, this does not fill me with joy or to me constitute progress.

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