You are reading

NYC Public High Schools to Reopen In-Person Classes Later This Month

(Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)

March 8, 2021 By Allie Griffin

New York City high schoolers will be welcomed back to the classroom at the city’s public schools later this month, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today.

Roughly 55,000 high school students who signed up for in-person learning in the fall will return to school buildings, starting on March 22 after about four months of fully remote learning. The school buildings have been closed since November when COVID-19 cases spiked.

“We are ready to go,” de Blasio said during a press briefing Monday. “We have all the pieces we need to bring high school back and bring it back strong and of course to bring it back safely.”

Public high schools are the last to reopen for in-person classes. Middle schools reopened in-person instruction last month and elementary schools reopened in December.

Students, educators and school staff will be subject to random COVID-19 testing weekly as part of the city’s reopening plan.

The reopening of high schools is one of the first major responsibilities for the new Schools Chancellor Meisha Ross Porter as head of the Department of Education. She will take over as Schools Chancellor from Richard Carranza on March 15.

“My priority as chancellor is to open, open, open,” Porter said during the briefing. “I am thrilled that we are making good on that with today’s announcement.”

“As the parent of a tenth grader, I can tell you firsthand how exciting it is that we are reopening high schools on March 22,” she said.

Less than 20 percent of all public school high schoolers — 55,000 out of 282,000 students — have signed up for in-person instruction.

De Blasio also announced that all school sports will resume in mid-April — with an extended season through August to make up for lost time. Both students who opted for full remote learning and those who opted for in-person will be allowed to participate.

The mayor said there will be strict protocols, like mask requirements, weekly COVID-19 testing and a “heavy emphasis on moving sports outdoors.”

De Blasio said he hopes to reopen schools fully in September.

“There is nothing more essential to our recovery than bringing back our public schools,” de Blasio said. “Families depend on them; everything revolves around our public schools.”

email the author: news@queenspost.com
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Five Queens startups win $20,000 each in 2024 Tech + Innovation Challenge

May. 19, 2024 By Czarinna Andres

A diverse range of businesses, including a yoga studio, an olive oil distributor, a female health care provider, a sustainable mushroom farmer, and an AI-powered physical therapy service, have been named winners of the 2024 Queens Tech + Innovation Challenge (QTIC). Each winner will receive a $20,000 grant to support their business operations.

QBP Richards, advocates rally to demand Mayor Adams restore funding to City’s libraries

May. 17, 2024 By Gabriele Holtermann

A rally was held at the Queens Public Library at Forest Hills on May 16, during which Queens Borough President Donovan Richards, Queens Public Library President and CEO Dennis Walcott, union reps and library advocates called on Mayor Eric Adams to reverse the proposed $58.3 million budget cuts to the New York Public Library (NYPL), the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), and the Queens Public Library (QBL) for Fiscal Year 2025, which begins on July 1, 2024.

Queens elected officials secure $70 million from New York State Budget for school safety equipment in religious and independent schools

May. 17, 2024 By Anthony Medina

Religious and independent schools throughout the city will soon receive additional funding for school safety equipment, thanks to Assemblymember Andrew Hevesi and State Senator Michael Gianaris, who, after extensive advocacy efforts, successfully secured $70 million from the New York State Budget for 2024-25 for Non-Public School Safety Equipment (NPSE) grants.