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Court Square: Man Falls 15 Feet Under Subway Grate

Emergency crew stand over grate where he fell

Emergency crew stand over grate where he fell

June 2, 2015 By Jackie Strawbridge

A man fell into a subway grate at Court Square this morning after trying to retrieve keys he had dropped there.

The incident occurred at approximately 11 a.m. outside of 24-20 Jackson Ave.

FDNY Battalion Chief James Maloney said that the man appeared to have removed the sidewalk grating and entered the 15-foot pit, which vents out the trains that run below, with a ladder in order to retrieve his keys.

The ladder stretched only about 10 feet. Maloney said it is unclear whether the man fell into the pit while descending or ascending on the ladder.

He suffered injuries to his hip and head and was removed in an ambulance to Bellevue Hospital at roughly 11:30 a.m. Maloney could not confirm his age but said he was middle aged.

The MTA was onsite replacing and cementing the grating after the man was rescued, Maloney said.

“Removing a subway grating in itself is very dangerous,” Maloney said, adding that if someone were to lose an item down a grate, the best course of action is to call 311.

Victims truck and ladder

Victims truck and ladder

 

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6 Comments

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Anonymous visitor

What’s wrong with you people? OK, he shouldn’t have climbed down in that pit. But for god’s sake, the guy really hurt himself. Let’s hope you find more charitable people the next time you do something you might regret.

Reply
David

No, the problem is we waste too much effort trying to insulate people from their own stupidity when we should be letting natural selection kick in. This wasn’t misjudging space on the road and having an accident or not recognizing the danger he was putting himself in. The guy (a) removed a subway grate and (b) got a ladder to try to climb into a space that is clearly designed to be separated form the public for safety. This was willful, obvious, “you shouldn’t be doing this”, engineered stupidity. Zero pity.

Reply
ha!

i completely agree.

why coddle people for making stupid decisions.

this man is no child sticking his finger in an electrical outlet out of curiosity (i used to love doing that)

in some countries they may even kill you for being this stupid and careless

Reply
Yea

Efin moron. Too bad he didn”t fall and break his damn head. For good. Now he’s a walking liability to our city.

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