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Catholic Schools in Queens and Brooklyn Introduce Social Justice Curriculum

Queens and Brooklyn Catholic schools have begun teaching a curriculum on social justice to their students (Sam Balye via Unsplash)

Sept. 27, 2021 By Michael Dorgan

Catholic schools in Queens and Brooklyn are now teaching a new social justice curriculum that aims to teach students about tolerance and respect.

The schools started teaching the new curriculum last week as the Brooklyn Diocese, which oversees Catholic schools in Queens and Brooklyn, aims to address topics such as hate and racism.

The new curriculum involves monthly lessons and conversations on social justice, race, tolerance and equality, according to Reverend Nicholas DiMarzio, the Bishop of Brooklyn. The initiative was prompted by a 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virg., where a racist rallygoer deliberately drove his car into a crowd of protestors killing a woman.

“This school year, we are introducing a curriculum in response to the difficulties we have witnessed in our communities and in our nation,” Bishop DiMarzio said. “Within the last year, the significant increase in overt acts of hate and racism is alarming.”

The new curriculum has become a component of religious classes at all Catholic school institutions in the diocese.

Educators are focusing on a different theme each month. For instance, “solidarity” is the basis for this month’s lessons and students are asked to share their personal experiences on the topic.

The curriculum will also incorporate literature, art and activities to deliver the lessons, the Diocese said.

Dr. Thomas Chadzutko, Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Brooklyn, said that the curriculum is critical to advancing the values of respect for one another and love of fellow man.

“It is important to teach our students the lessons of acceptance, tolerance, and understanding if we are to look to bring an end to the tension and uneasiness that exists in our society due to racism,” Chadzutko said.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

2 Comments

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JaimeB

This CRT stuff degrades every academic institution it touches. Prepare for unhappy parents of all races and declining enrollment.

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MRLIC

Systemic Racism is a Political ploy by the Democratic Socialist Party in power on Wash. D.C. now. (Biden Admin.). For the ampuntbof cops that make arrests all across thuis country the percentage of shootings os very small. Many were shot resisting arrest also. The Dem. Sicialists used these shootings to win the Presidential election for the black vote.Teaching lids respect for each othet is Good. Teachong kids Critical Race Theory is BAD.
All whote people are NOT inherently racist and all black people are not oppressed and should not feel that way. The biased Dem.
Socialist MEDIA petpetuates this Propaganda. Temember BLM was founded by a Marxist and is a racist org.

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