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7 Line Stations Now Have Countdown Clocks, Completes Installation Through Entire Subway System

Countdown clock at the 46 St on the 7 line. (Photo: Nathaly Pesantez)

Jan. 2, 2018 By Nathaly Pesantez

All stations along the 7 train line now have working countdown clocks, the last line through the entire subway system to roll out the displays.

Countdown clocks installed through the line’s 22 stations went live on Dec. 31, and tell riders, in minutes, when the next train is scheduled to arrive.

The last roll out completes the MTA’s plans to outfit all 472 stations in the subway system with real-time train arrival displays.

The MTA announced in July that countdown clocks would be arriving to the 7 line in December, along with several other lines still without the digital displays.

Countdown clock at the 40 Street station on the 7 line. (Photo: Nathaly Pesantez)

Arrival times can also be accessed by cell phone via the MTA’s SubwayTime app.

The first countdown clocks were installed in 2007 along the L line, and an accelerated effort was underway to bring the countdown clocks to all remaining stations by the end of 2017.

“Real-time arrival information is no longer just a nice amenity to have – it’s a necessity at a time when our customers are accustomed to having access to information in their hands almost immediately,” said MTA Chairman Joseph Lhota in November 2017, when countdown clocks on the D, F, J, and Z lines went live.

“This is just one of many improvements we’re making to ensure that our customers are getting the clearest, most up-to-date information about their commute.”

email the author: news@queenspost.com

3 Comments

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MRLIC

I agree with nycnative. Sure they are marginally helpful. To tell us our train is going to be late -not running etc… could have waited until things improve in the Subways. (If they Ever do under their current inept management). The Gov. & Mayor have not done much to help or change the way the MTA does business. The placement of some of these digital signs is questionable. I think one near the turnstiles and another on the platforms would have been ideal for most stations. Why was the 7 basically the last to get them also. Are 7 riders step children?

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nycnative

woo-hoo! now we have digital screens to tell us that the trains are delayed/broken/not running. How did we ever live without these!? Oh right, there’s an app (or 5) for that.

What an excellent decision the MTA made to spend money on these signs. They will certainly prepare us all very well for the 2019 Brooklyn invasion! Can’t wait!

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Anonymous

It’s like taking a DNA test and discovering you have a rare condition and have a few years to live. Whether you know or not, you’re still f*cked.

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