You are reading

Trader Joe’s Expected to Open Long Island City Store By End of Summer

The Prime Building, located at 22-43 Jackson Ave., on Jan. 13. Trader Joe’s will occupy the ground floor of the building (Michael Dorgan, Queens Post).

Jan. 14, 2021 By Michael Dorgan

The Trader Joe’s store planned for Long Island City is expected to open before the end of the summer, according to a company spokesperson.

The grocery store chain is poised to move into a mixed-use building currently being constructed at 22-43 Jackson Ave.

Trader Joe’s will take up a 17,000 square-foot ground floor space of the 11-story, 70-unit building called the Prime Building. The building appears to be nearing completion with all the floor-to-ceiling windows now installed.

“We do not have an opening date as of yet, but we are hoping to open our Long Island City store before the end of the summer,” Trader Joe’s spokesperson Kenya Friend-Daniel told the Queens Post.

The store was originally expected to open in late 2020.

The new supermarket will compete with Foodcellar, which has a store in Court Square and another in Hunters Point, as well as Urban Market on 50th Avenue and Key Food on 44th Drive.

The Long Island City store will be the second Trader Joe’s location in Queens, as there is one in Rego Park.

Trader Joe’s is known for its quality products at affordable prices. It sells its own label products instead of name brands at lower costs.

email the author: [email protected]

12 Comments

Click for Comments 
Natalia

I’m very happy!!! Finally we can have trader Joe’s in LIC!! But please start as soon as possible!! The end to the summer is too much time ;_;.

Reply
Anon

It’s going to get even more crowded in that area with all of the people who will come from other parts of Queens for this. Get ready for a lot of them to drive and expect parking, too.

Reply
ASensibleMan

There is also a new supermarket set to open any day now in the Jacx building. The shelves are already stocked so it can’t be long.

LIC is going to have an abundance of supermarkets. But then, a few thousand more apartments are coming on line, so maybe they can all prosper.

Reply
OAR

None of the other Trader Joe’s in the city except for the one on Metropolitan Ave in Queens have parking lots and they are not used by only “Hoity-Toity locals”. There are 4 train lines and several bus lines that serve the area. Plus many people work in the area.

5
1
Reply
John doe

The fact that trader joe wants to put a store in the Long Island city area instead of investing into the community and not try to take the money from the public that lives that shows how these corporations don’t care about anything but there pockets and those that run trader joe should be ashamed of themselves can’t even give back to the community that they are going to Gentrify

5
31
Reply
ASensibleMan

The numerous jobs Trader Joe will create is “investing in the community.” They’re a supermarket, not a government agency. It’s not really their job to provide social benefits. Those are already handed out in the trillions of dollars across all levels of government.

14
1
Reply
KJ

Such good news. I’ve waited years for this. Quality products, good prices, fresh produce with longer expiration dates. Bring it on !

24
2
Reply
I wouldn't eat that

Fresh produce with longer expiration dates, sounds fishy. Produce has a short shelf life.

4
1
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

What the Five Ballot Proposal Questions Mean for New Yorkers this November

The city is not just choosing a new mayor in November. This fall, New York voters must also decide on five proposed changes to the state constitution.

Five ballot proposals are up for a vote in the general election on Nov. 2. They include questions on the future of political representation in Albany, environmental protections, easier voter registration and absentee balloting, and how New York’s civil courts function.The full text of the five proposals are listed on the Board of Elections website and at Ballotpedia, the nonprofit political encyclopedia. But voters who aren’t political mavens may need a bit of context: