You are reading

Queens Drivers Have an Easier Time Finding Parking than Most NYC Drivers: Study

Skillman Avenue in Sunnyside

Feb. 27, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Queens drivers have an easier time finding parking than most drivers in the city, according to a new study.

While looking for a legal place to park on Queens streets can be a headache-inducing activity, drivers in the World’s Borough spend less time searching for parking than drivers in three of the four other boroughs, according to a recent study by Zipcar.

Drivers in Queens spend 17 minutes on average looking for a public parking spot, according to the study — only Staten Islanders have it easier; it takes them about 16 minutes.

New York City drivers as a whole spend an average of 19 minutes looking for street parking with Manhattan and Brooklyn drivers spending 21 minutes and Bronx drivers spending the citywide average, according to the study.

However, some of the 796 New Yorkers surveyed said it takes them up to two hours to find a place to park their car.

Nearly every New Yorker interviewed — 92 percent — said finding public parking is stressful and 62 percent said it was “very” or “extremely stressful,” the study states.

In fact, finding parking in the City is so harrowing, some of the respondents said they were willing to give up social media, coffee, chocolate and even sex.

And like true New Yorkers, nearly 30 percent of those interviewed said they use profanity everyday while on the prowl for parking.

Manhattanites have the biggest potty mouths of the bunch, with 37 percent saying they curse while circling the block for parking and 24 percent of Queens drivers say the mutter a profanity or two in their everyday search as well.

email the author: [email protected]

7 Comments

Click for Comments 
Mort

Wrong. It’s impossible to find a free parking spot, the city has screwed the citizen with alternate side parking, fire plugs- which are non functional, bike lanes for hippies and tourists.

Reply
wendy werner

now that for every old house torn down in astoria, realtors are putting up a minimum of 6 story high buildings!!!! these buildings do not have parking garages. so now it is nearly impossible to find any parking in astoria.. and there is maybe 1 parking garage.

Reply
Sara Ross

Not in Forest Hills!!! I drive around anywhere from 10-45 minutes (not exaggerating) to find parking! I see plenty of permits from NYPD, FDNY, Courts and even saw a Federal permit the other day when there was alternate side parking and it was on the wrong side. Queens Blvd. is beyond impossible to find parking because the don’t pay a dime to the city or state bicyclists need their own lane so that those who do pay the city and state have to manuever in 1 lane, including buses, ambulances, fire engines, trucks and regular cars who pay to paint and repave the bike lanes with taxes, insurance, inspections, drivers licenses, muni meters, parking violations (bikers go through red lights and stop signs and the traffic cameras see this but the violators don’t get tickets). The roads are in horrible condition (jewel avenue and main street are like driving around obstacle courses, but yet on jewel avenue, the bike lane was repaved). Parking is a nightmare.

Reply
DB

“Nearly every New Yorker interviewed — 92 percent — said finding public parking is stressful and 62 percent said it was “very” or “extremely stressful,” the study states.”

This is why I got rid of my car. Now I live significantly more stress free than before. Not everyone has this ability because the city has been built to force people to by a car but hopefully that will change for people further out in Queens.

Reply
Mundek

Riiight. Particularly across Flushing, Jackson Hights, Elmhurst, Astoria, Sunnyside, LIC. Street parking is nearly impossible.

And if you find a spot then either a. alt side parking b. street racing crashes c. delivery/sanitation sideswipes or d. others inability to parallel park behind or in front – quickly quenches the enthusiasm.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Long Island City teen sentenced in fatal shooting of ‘beloved’ school teacher at Queensbridge Houses in 2020: DA

A Long Island City man on Friday, Jan. 28, was sentenced to 19 years in prison for the 2020 fatal shooting of a public school social studies teacher who was out walking his dog when he was caught in the crossfire during a confrontation between gang rivals in broad daylight, just blocks from his home, according to Queens District Attorney’s office.

Ike Ford, 19, of 12th Street, in Long Island City, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the first degree before Queens Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Holder. The teacher, George Rosa, 53, was shot in his abdomen by a stray bullet fired by Ford, who was just 17 years old at the time of the shooting but was sentenced as an adult given the severity of the crime, according to Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.

LaGuardia Community College President Kenneth Adams explained that the school lost nearly a quarter of its students at the height of the pandemic due to the economic effects of the lockdown on low-income Queens households.

BP launches new advisory panel for youth to become civically engaged in the future of Queens

In an effort to get more young people involved in civics, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards has created a new advisory panel known as the Youth and Young Adult Council to introduce the “youngest and fiercest” community advocates to both community service and organization.

Members of the advisory body will advocate concerns through means of community engagement by participating in one of two cohorts. The first will be made up of high school representatives between the ages of 13 and 17, while the second cohort will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 18 and 25.

These Queens eateries are participating in the upcoming NYC Restaurant Week

NYC Restaurant Week is underway, so nix that skillet and bring family and friends to your favorite neighborhood spot, or get inspired and break bread somewhere new and different. During this special citywide culinary event, food-lovers will enjoy curated menus and prix-fixe prices that are easy on the wallet.

Bookings began on Jan. 17 and are available until Feb. 12, and you can reserve a table at 30 participating Queens restaurants, along with hundreds more across the five boroughs.