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Permits Filed for 12-Story Mixed-Use Building Near Queens Plaza

42-62 Hunter St. (Google Maps)

Dec. 14, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

Building permits have been filed for a 12-story mixed-use building in the Queens Plaza section of Long Island City.

The plans call for a 125-foot-tall structure at 42-62 Hunter St., according to documents filed with the Dept. of Buildings on Dec.10.

The building will contain 27 apartments and will take up more than 30,000 square feet. There will be three units on each floor from 2 through 9, with one unit on each of the upper floors.

The plans call for retail space on the first floor and in the cellar. There will also be 15 bicycle spaces and a compactor room in the cellar. The plans do not include space for parking.

Demolition permits were filed in August.

XI Zhao, operating as Hunter Square LLC, is listed as the owner while Michael Kang Architect P.C. is listed as the architect.

Hunter Square LLC purchased the lot in 2019 for around $3 million, according to the city records.

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Sandro

Demolish started last week, and right now they’re just about to wrap up debris removal.

they’ve also just started building the wooden fence around the lot, which seems to include also 27-20 42nd Rd (which hosted Pulsar Technology Systems) — do you have any news about that?

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Anon

Looks like 42-64 next door to the left was also purchased to combine the lots. Surprised that a 12 story can go in there. Did they purchase air rights as well?

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