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New Sushi Restaurant Opens Inside The JACX Office Tower in LIC

DIY boxes on offer at Temakase (Photos provided by Gina G PR)

Sept. 29, 2021 By Michael Dorgan

A restaurant that specializes in sushi rolls has opened in a new high-rise office building in Long Island City.

Temakase, which has locations in Manhattan and Florida, opened Wednesday inside The JACX, a 26-story two-tower building located at 28-07 Jackson Ave.

The company has moved into a space inside the building’s expansive food hall, called JACX&CO, which is located on the ground floor of the building on the corner of Jackson Avenue and Queens Plaza South.

The Long Island City location is the company’s first in Queens and third in the U.S.

Temakase makes its sushi rolls from fresh fish, seaweed and cooked rice. Some of its fish selections include blue crab, tuna, lobster, salmon and yellowtail.

The company’s sushi roll dishes are served in different sizes from eight to 24 pieces.

Customers can also purchase the company’s new DIY handroll boxes. The boxes contain cooked fish and other ingredients required to assemble the sushi rolls from home.

The company is giving away a free selection of sushi rolls through October 31st to mark the opening of the new eatery. The offer is limited to one selection per person.

Opening hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Sundays.

Some of the food on offer at Temakase in Long Island City (Photos provided by Gina G PR)

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