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More Streets in Queens Will Be Made Car-Free

Open Streets on 39th Avenue in Sunnyside (Photo: Asha MacKay)

June 24, 2020 By Allie Griffin

More Queens streets will be shuttered to traffic as the city introduces another wave of the Open Streets initiative first announced in April.

Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled an additional 23 miles today that will be open to pedestrians and cyclists through the course of the pandemic.

The shuttered streets allow New Yorkers to get fresh air, while having space to practice safe social distancing.

The new open streets cross several neighborhoods in Queens.

Three newly announced streets are near parks:

.28 miles of 35th Avenue from Corbett Road to dead end by Crocheron Park

.33 miles of Shore Boulevard from Ditmars Boulevard to 20th Avenue by Ralph DeMarco Park

.12 miles of Ditmars Boulevard from 19th Street to Shore Boulevard by Ralph DeMarco Park

Five will be enforced by local precincts:

.09 miles of 165th Street, from Chapin Parkway to 85th Avenue in Jamaica Hills

.2 miles of Onderdonk Avenue, from Starr Street to DeKalb Avenue in Ridgewood

.29 miles of 77th Street, from Atlantic Avenue to 101st Street in Ozone Park

.27 miles of Rockaway Freeway, from Ocean Crest Boulevard to Regina Avenue in Far Rockaway

.07 miles of 60th Street, from Queens Boulevard to 43rd Avenue in Woodside

Five streets will be opened in partnership with local community groups:

.24 miles of 37th Avenue, from 75th Street to 80th Street on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Thai Community USA)

.15 miles of Newtown Avenue, from 30th Avenue to 31st Street on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Central Astoria LDC)

.15 miles of 32nd Street, from 30th Avenue to Newtown Avenue on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Central Astoria LDC)

.52 miles of Reads Lane, from Empire Avenue to Jarvis Avenue on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (JCCRP)

.25 miles of Beach 12th Street, from Central Avenue to Dinsmore Avenue on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (JCCRP)

No through traffic is permitted on the streets from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. each day, unless otherwise specified. Local deliveries, pick-ups/drop-offs, necessary city service, utility, and emergency vehicles only are allowed.

Temporary Bicycle Lane

The city will also install a temporary protected 3.6-mile bike lane along Northern Boulevard, from 34th Avenue to Queensboro Plaza.

The lane will be phased in through the summer by using markings, barrels, signage, and other barriers, to implement both permanent and temporary connectors to existing bike lanes.

With the new open streets, New York City now has 67 miles of car-free roads for pedestrians and cyclists to enjoy.

“As the school year ends and a hot, challenging summer begins, New Yorkers will need more options to play outside,” Mayor de Blasio said in a statement. “New York City now offers more car-free street space than any other city in the country, and we’re proud to build on that progress in all five boroughs.”

A full list of streets closed to traffic can be found on the Department of Transportation website.

A bicyclist taking advantage of “open streets” on Skillman Avenue between 39th Place and 43rd Street (Photo: Asha MacKay)

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