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LIC residents expand hyperlocal site ‘Tenant King’

April 22, 2015 By Michael Florio

A site that aims to connect Long Island City residents with one another where they are able to sell goods and inform each other about local events has expanded to cover the entire neighborhood.

Tenant King, a website that launched last year, providing residents with the option to connect exclusively with fellow tenants—or to residents throughout the neighborhood—has expanded to cover the whole of Long Island City.

Michael Noormagi, the CEO, said the site was originally offered to residents living in select buildings in Court Square and Hunters Point.

Noormagi, who said that 1,100 people had registered prior to the expansion, noted that since March the number had grown to 1,300.

“March was one of our best months since launching the site as far as new users go,” Noormagi said.

The site is being used for residents to buy and sell items, and provides them with the ability to submit events on a calendar.

“We are being used as a more trustworthy alternative to Craigslist at this point,” he said. “You will see people selling electronics, furniture and even baby items on our site.”

Users must verify their address–either with a piece of mail, a credit card or by taking a snap shot of their utility bill.

Noormagi said that an app is also in the works.

Noormagi founded the site with two fellow LIC residents Patrik Misko and Michael Rossi. They elected to launch their site in LIC after witnessing firsthand the development of the neighborhood.

“We saw the growing community and recognized the need for this service,” he said. “There have been similar services for one building, but we wanted something to connect the growing neighborhood.”

For the Tenant King website, please click here

email the author: news@queenspost.com

35 Comments

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LicPostReader

…remember last summer when they had tenant king people in the street. I wonder if they will be back?

Reply
BH

I had a little problem registering and validating my address, but their support was superb and helped me.

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Robyn

Tenant King is a really good local resource. I just had a baby and had to sell some furniture to make room and the site proved useful!

Reply
Big Rav

We have successfully bought & sold items on Tenant King. What makes it unique is that everyone on it is within a few blocks.
Highly recommended!!

Reply
Anonymous visitor

Too bad I’ve just moved out of LIC, I was always thinking a site like this should exist. FaceBook is for closer friends, not neighbors.

Reply
Michael

We are currently funded by angel investors and are entirely focused on growth and product development. The hyperlocal nature of our business offers a variety of monetization opportunities in the long run.

Reply
$

Start up speak for: “We aren’t. But we will, by selling access to your info to advertisers/merchants or charging fees to users to post. Have not decided.”

Reply
RB

Who cares, they have my name and address and spam mail email account. That’s of negligible value in return for which I get access to a site that’s very useful.

Reply
Michael

There are already independent chapters of Tenant King live in the Financial District, Battery Park City, and Peter Cooper Village & Stuyvesant Town. We are seeing a growing interest in other Manhattan neighborhoods as well and will make expansion decisions accordingly.

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Anonymous visitor

What’s the difference between this and Building Link? I mean… I’m not a fan of Building Link at all, but seems like tenants are forced to use that by building managements.

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PM

What’s the difference? Well, platforms like Building Link are made for management companies and are maintained by management companies. It’s really not for people living in those buildings. I’m living in Avalon Riverview North and here we had that platform as well, but it was never updated, everything was censored by someone from the management company. They shut down the platform in our building like a year ago… On Tenant King however, we can freely list items for sale or simply discuss stuff, form and act like a community.

Reply
RB

Another big difference between this and Building Link is that everyone in LIC can see your posts, as opposed to just those in your building.

Reply
Georg

True, but I usually prefer using the building “circle” as they call it on Tenant King, I don’t want the whole neighborhood to see my building’s private issues.

Reply
Free

You may want just your building when airing grievances amongst residents, but it’s great to have a wider circle when buying and selling stuff. Or expressing thoughts/ideas on community-wide issues.

Reply
Tom

I really like TenantKing! Not only I bought a lot of great things to my apartment but also made new friends. I wish everybody in New York used TenantKing…

Reply
reddy kilowatt

I have been on it for awhile

it shows me a good portion of the residents are broke

selling stuff for $5.00?

who has the time

Reply
kelly

Ha.. I got the exact opposite impression. I’ve seen some pretty expensive stuff listed there. I bet those people offer those things cheaper than in the store, but still… and I’ve seen some move out sales too, it sounds much easier to pick up a piece of furniture from my neighbor than from ikea…

Reply
Free

I’m just happy to have a local site where I can sell, or even give away stuff, instead of throwing it out.

Reply
Anonymous visitor

Yeah well there are cheap or free stuff sometimes but you can find nice and quality stuff for half price and within walking distance.

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