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Julie Won Takes Commanding Lead in Race to Represent 26th Council District

Julie Won is the likely winner of the 26th District council race (Facebook)

July 3, 2021 By Christian Murray

Julie Won has taken an unassailable lead in the Democratic primary to represent the 26th Council District in western Queens.

Won and Amit Bagga were neck and neck in the city’s most crowded council race on election night but after the implementation of ranked choice voting she has taken a commanding lead.

She has a lead of 1,420 votes, according to the results released by the NYC Board of Election Friday night.

Won and Bagga broke out from the rest of the 15-candidate field on the night of the election and were less than one percentage point apart, or 125 votes.

But she benefited greatly from ranked choice voting. Won, a tech consultant and Sunnyside resident, finished with 6,135 votes to his 4,715.

There are still 2,692 absentee ballots to be counted.

The BOE is expected to release the results with the absentee ballots included next week. It plans to have the results certified in the week of July 12 or later.

Won will compete in the November general election against Republican Marvin Jeffcoat. The winner will serve a two year term.

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Anonymous

Vote Republican this November …. Unless you are more concerned with keeping criminals out of jail and out on our streets and neighborhoods.

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MRLIC

Julie Won is supported by Democratic Card Carrying Socialist Party member. AOC. AOC IS A RADICAL LEFT WING DEMOCRAT.
Anti American Anti Whte.and bordering on Communism. Shrle spteads falsehoods and pulls out the Race card all too quickly.

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This Guy is annoying

And you pull out the Communist / Socialist card too quickly and likely can’t explain either.

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Anonymous

The endorsement of Jimmy Van Bramer significantly hurt Amit’s chances to be ranked as second and onward choices by so many people that did not like Van Bramer’s style of dictatorship. Just look how low Van Bramer’s numbers were for Queens Borough President. He was eliminated immediately the first night. With a week to go before the election, the Van Bramer endorsement significantly hurt, after months of efforts, with a pivotal speech and phot-op by Van Bramer and his office team. Hopefully Julie will ‘clean house’ and start with a totally brand new office staff and act upon the residents’ wishes, for which she received votes to upheld, and not her own. It is clear that this neighborhood wants a complete leadership change and style after twelve years. I can not wait until January 1, 2022 for our neighborhood!

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Anonymous

Couldn’t agree more with these comments. JVB totally disregarded many of his people and refused to consider others not aligned with his own interests. He did it in such a fashion that it really did feel like a dictatorship with someone enjoying their power too much. Hopefully Won will listen to all her people.

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