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Governor Andrew Cuomo Apologizes Amid Sexual Harassment Allegations; Says He Won’t Resign

Governor Andrew Cuomo (Darren McGee- Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo)

March 3, 2021 By Allie Griffin

In his first public appearance since multiple women accused him of sexual harassment, Governor Andrew Cuomo apologized for his behavior, but refused to resign from office as several Queens legislators have called for.

Cuomo issued the apology on Wednesday after two former staffers accused the governor of sexual harassment and a third woman accused him of unwanted touching at a 2019 wedding reception.

“I want New Yorkers to hear from me directly on this… I now understand that I acted in a way that made people feel uncomfortable,” he said during a live press briefing. “It was unintentional and I truly and deeply apologize for it.”

Cuomo said he felt “awful” and “embarrassed” about the allegations as he choked up at times during his address.

“I never touched anyone inappropriately,” he said. “I never knew at the time that I was making anyone feel uncomfortable.”

Several Democratic lawmakers in New York — including multiple in Queens — have demanded that Cuomo resign in light of the sexual harassment allegations. State Sen. Jessica Ramos, Assembly Member Jessica González-Rojas and Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer have all said that he should resign.

Cuomo rebuffed their demands at the press briefing and said that they were politicians “playing politics.”

“I was elected by the people of the state of New York, I’m not going to resign,” he said. “I work for the people of the state of New York.”

The State Attorney General Letitia James is investigating the allegations.

Cuomo said that he will fully cooperate with her investigation. He also asked New Yorkers to wait for the results of the investigation before forming an opinion.

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6 Comments

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Ghost of Leviticus

Let’s be clear here: It’s an open secret that Cuomo has been doing this for years. This is being used now to keep him from becoming a primary threat for Kamala in 2024. That’s why the focus is on the sex scandals not the real scandal which is the nursing homes deaths. Clearly DNC does not want the nursing home issue to spill over and hurt other blue state dem governors who committed similar crimes. Once Cuomo is sidelined, Creepy Joe will be next with the touchy hair-sniffing unless he just putters out on his own. All roads being cleared for Kamala. You read it here first folks.

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Larry Penner

Governor Cuomo doesn’t always practice what he preaches that asked New Yorker’s not to pass judgement until State Attorney General Letitia James completes her investigation concerning charges against him of sexual harassment. Cuomo was not so charitable over past decades with other elected officials facing the same charges. As for sexual harassment training, employees receive a certificate upon completion. May we see a copy of his certificate? It would include who provided the training and the date he completed the session. Cuomo needs a refresher course from South Park’s Sexual Harassment Panda.

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Gantry Gal

The have to protect their boy. If it were anyone in the right, there’d be protests in the streets.

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