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Design Firm Calls For Floating Bridge Between LIC and Greenpoint

The Longpoint Corridor, via Creme / Jun Aizaki Architecture and Design

May 17, 2018 By Nathaly Pesantez

A Brooklyn-based design and architecture firm has put forth a concept for a floating pedestrian bridge and beautified corridor between Greenpoint and Long Island City.

The project, called the “Longpoint Corridor” and selected as a finalist for this year’s NYCxDESIGN award, seeks to provide a small but significant commuting solution between the two neighborhoods over Newtown Creek and revitalize underused areas at each end of the proposed bridge.

Creme / Jun Aizaki Architecture and Design, the firm behind the concept, imagines a bridge made of timber connecting the existing Manhattan Avenue Park to Vernon Boulevard just below 54th Avenue, near the existing Pulaski Bridge.

The “Longpoint Bridge”, outfitted with triangles peaks, would accommodate cyclists and those on foot, and can split apart to let barges pass. The bridge would be built high enough, however, to allow for small vessels like canoes to pass through underneath.

via Creme / Jun Aizaki Architecture and Design

The firm says the bridge’s installation and design is inexpensive, and would require minimal repairs over time. The connection, in addition, echoes the old Vernon Avenue Bridge, which was demolished in 1954 to make way for the Pulaski Bridge.

On either end of the bridge, the firm conceptualizes revitalized “landings” in the form of open spaces with greenery, bike stands, and beyond. The “Manhattan landing”, for example, could become a “buzzing micro-district” or a daily retreat for all.

On the Long Island City side, renderings show an open space expanding to Vernon Boulevard complete with trees, benches, and a wooden boardwalk.

“With so many new residential buildings popping up in LIC and Hunter Point, it makes logistical sense to have a walking and biking path along the creek to give access to public transportation,” the firm said.

via Creme / Jun Aizaki Architecture and Design

After the open space on Vernon Boulevard, a pedestrian bridge going over the LIRR tracks is also proposed, which would connect the “corridor” to Borden Avenue and complete the project.

The project is estimated to cost $32 million to build out over two years.

In addition, the design firm will be launching a kickstarter page for their proposal tonight, with a goal of raising $50,000 in 30 days towards research and a feasibility study of the project.

To learn more about the project, visit its website here.

email the author: [email protected]

32 Comments

Jack

Just a modest warning, to entertain your brain,
They’re coming in the morning, to catch the 7 train.




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MRLIC

The FAKE MRLIC wrote the May 18 2018 comment. I personally don’t like the idea. The BOX Trolley I heard is a dead issue.




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Anonymous

The creek actually sees a lot of traffic and most of it passes under the Pulaski without the bridge needed to be raised. This bridge is so low it would require opening for practically all water traffic (except canoe/kayak). This requires a 24/7 bridge operator and for that alone I doubt they’ll do (they didn’t want to build another toilet facility in gantry park because of the maintenance costs).




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chaz

Not needed. We have a bridge with new bike lanes. They just want some free press.




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stan chaz

This idea needs to be incorporated into the proposed BQX trolley/light rail line that would better connect booming waterfront communities in both Brooklyn and Queens – growing communities that need improved transportation infrastructure.
Bridge use could be limited to the BQX , pedestrians and bike riders and would offer a simple and direct route to both Franklin Street, Kent Avenue and beyond for all of them –not to mention connecting the string of waterfront parks and office complexes being built along the entire waterfront.
The nearby & massive Pulaski bridge is a difficult access point for both pedestrians and bikers, with very long access ramps leading up to a bridge height of well over 100 feet. The actual width of the river crossing at this point is perhaps a short 300 feet, but using the Pulaski bridge makes it into a round-about journey and a mile long trek. Except for vehicular traffic, the Pulaski bridge is far from a direct or easy connection between Greenpoint and Long Island City.
Both Brooklyn and Queens are well on their way to becoming thriving centers of work , play & residence in their own right- while most of our transportation projects and options are still Manhattan-oriented. It’s time, way past time, to better knit these two boroughs together with proposals such as this bridge and the BQX.
It’s a win-win situation.




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ginobrino

Pie in the sky architecture school type project. Probably had some interns with nothing to do.




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Flushing Skeptic

I think this is a great idea! The more crossings there are, the better off everyone will be, and this would be much safer then the Pulaski for both pedestrians or bikers.




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Anonymous

If they didn’t have a pedestrian/bike lane on the Pulaski I’d say it was a good idea but it’s kinda redundant. If you google pedestrian bridges you’ll see a lot of pretty cool ideas worldwide. One in particular rolled up like a pinwheel and unrolled to span short distances. Perfect for something like Anabal basin or Newtown creek.




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Dan

I thought the same thing but I think the real benefits of this bridge is 1. It’s shorter (since you don’t have to walk/bike up then down) and more importantly 2. The plan is to connect this to an open space to allow for more leisurely walks rather than connecting straight to Jackson Ave. The plans are to finish Hunter’s Point South park as well as the parks along the water in Greenpoint so it would be a nice connection between the two.




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Albert

Anything that gets people off subways and buses and out of cars is an improvement.




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gdfgfs

There really needs to be a bridge there, but I wish it was a proper bridge so buses could use it.




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Anonymous

Like the bridge idea. Maybe the architecture team could also come up with a creative solution to the menace of the roaring, rumbling, stinking locomotives on the LIRR tracks. Besides the Newtown Creek, the excessive noise and air pollution generated at the LIRR tracks are the biggest environmental and visual nuisance in the area.




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Eric

The railroad was there when you moved into the area, no…? I agree, serious environmental remediation is necessary in parts of LIC. However, matters have substantially improved from when a fat rendering plant was in Greenpoint. The noxious smell was so pervasive that it came through closed car windows. There was also a tall smokestack from which a large flame burned off by-product methane. Various issues have been abated, but the LIRR its noise, rumbling locomotives and coaches, and pollution will remain. Perhaps we should focus our efforts on the pollution issue – although I think the LIRR only uses the electrical component of their diesel/electric locomotives within the confines of the city limit, by law.




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OAR

Those LIRR tracks were there long before your apartment. This is still an industrial area, there wasn’t a problem until developers decided it would be a good idea to build a luxury high rise across the street. Buyer beware. The LIRR tracks aren’t going away, especially with the push for more mass transit. No one is forcing you to live near them.




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gdfgfs

When the east side access is complete the need for the LIC station will be greatly reduced. So the city should bury three tracks and platforms (with vents) and just built over it.




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Weezer

Sure, the LIRR, and the filthy Newtown Creek, were here before most of us moved to LIC. So we should just sit back, be grateful we weren’t alive in the late 19th century, and do nothing to address their problems? Noise control remediation and architectural solutions are available to lesson the impacts of the LIRR for everyone in the neighborhood. For the life of me, I can’t understand how anyone would be opposed to the idea.




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you!

this is cool and all, but the pulauski does just fine especially now that pedestrians and cyclists have their own protected lanes.

there’s other places this money can go. like, i dunno…. street cleaning? our sidewalks and streets are nasty. especially along jackson.




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stan chaz

Have you ever actually used the Pulaski bridage, which you can’t even spell properly? The Pulaski is a massive bridge that involves a tortuous round-about journey with mile long access ramps – a bridge that is clearly built & suited for vehicular traffic. Try walking or biking its lengthly exposed heights in brutal winter weather! This new bridge proposal is an ideal use of funds to directly & easily connect these booming waterfront communities on both sides with a low, short-rise & relatively inexpensive bridge.




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you!

several times a week, year round. toughen up buttercup. gotta go over a bridge to cross a waterway. if this is too much for your delicate physique i’d hate to see you bike over the 59th.




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Mythoughts

Love this! Will better connect LIC, Greenpoint and Williamsburg communities with walking and biking options for recreation and commuting.




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LIC Neighbor

Yeah who is going to pay for it? How about a hipster toll on the bridge?




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gdfgfs

The state pays for pedestrian bridges in towns that have lower populations than a one block area in the city.




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Old time resident/ current pedestrian

This is the location of the old Vernon Blvd-Greenpoint Bridge ( demolished after the construction of the Pulaski). Focused on pedestrians/ bicyclists ). BRILLIANT.




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gdfgfs

I would like a fully restored bridge that could carry buses or light rail.

But a pedestrian bridge is better than nothing.




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James E

Absolutely not! This would just bring more riff raff into LIC. We have enough problems with delinquents in the park at all hours. Stay on your side of the creek you foul smelling Brooklynites.




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Move To The Suburbs Already

What are you talking about this neighborhood is a ghost town most of the time. Time for you to move to Westchester where you belong!




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[email protected]

Ha ha! Seriously. It does seem like Brooklyn has been leaking into LIC lately. Strange packs of vintage bearded people have been sited recently wandering the streets.




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