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Coffee Project NY to Open Long Island City Shop and Training Center

Inside Coffee Project NY’s Long Island City location (Coffee Project NY Instagram)

Dec. 8, 2019 By Allie Griffin

A NYC coffee shop known for its deconstructed lattes is opening its first Queens location in Long Island City this week.

Coffee Project NY, which currently has two cafes, will open a 3,725-square-foot coffee shop, roastery and training center at 21-10 51st Ave.

Co-owners Chi Sum Ngai and Kaleena Teoh first opened Coffee Project NY in Manhattan’s East Village in 2015 and opened a second location in Brooklyn in 2018.

The new branch will feature a cafe, roastery, coffee literary library, wide array of coffee making equipment and the only Specialty Coffee Association (SCA) certified premier training campus in New York City. The SCA training offers classes for beginners and experts from introduction to coffee to roasting.

Coffee Project NY has become known for its nitrogen-infused cold brew and deconstructed latte — three separate glasses where one has a shot of espresso, one has a shot of steamed milk and the third has both liquids together in a latte — which has been featured in numerous articles.

The opening of Coffee Project NY’s Long Island City cafe, roastery and training center follows the addition of another popular New York City coffee house to Long Island City.

Last month, Joe Coffee opened its first Queens cafe, roastery and lab at 40-37 23rd St. The coffee house will also host coffee-making educational classes at its Roastery Lab.

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nogaryveeforme

looks like such a stunning setup and i love everything that is happening here, except the location. No foot traffic aside from Gary Vee’s cronies upstairs in Vayner…..

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