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After Van Bramer and Levin bill, City outlines $15 million plan to promote inclusivity, equity, and increased access in arts and culture for New Yorkers

July 20, 2017 By Nathaly Pesantez

The city has revealed the framework of an initiative aimed at increasing arts and culture for all New Yorkers.

CreateNYC, the name of the plan, was unveiled on July 19 and focuses on retaining New York’s identity as an international beacon for the creative community. The plan highlights eight issue areas, including supporting arts and culture in communities, promoting affordable spaces for artists, bringing more arts education to schools, and retaining the character of a neighborhood.

A screenshot from the CreateNYC site

“New York City is the world capital of art and culture,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio in a statement. “If we are going to continue to live up to that title we must use every tool we have to ensure that every resident, in every neighborhood, has the same access to cultural opportunities.”

CreateNYC came about through a 2015 law sponsored by Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer and Steve Levin requiring the city to create a blueprint for a cultural plan.

“The completion of the first cultural plan for New York City is a profound and historic achievement,” Van Bramer said in a statement. “With nearly 200,000 New Yorkers weighing in, we’ve built a plan that will guide our efforts to make art and culture more accessible to all, to empower and train the next generation of artists, and to fully support established and emerging cultural organizations in every borough, especially in areas that are traditionally underserved.

The plan was developed over a period of six months, with input from New York City residents, artists, cultural organizations, and arts and culture experts, according to the CreateNYC site.

Some outlined strategies include increased Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) funding for cultural programming in low-income communities and for underrepresented groups. The DCLA will also increase support for individual artists through its re-grant partners, and work to support translation services at cultural organizations.

“Through CreateNYC, NYC Cultural Affairs has created more than just a document,” said Council Member Stephen Levin in a statement. “It is an open commitment to inclusive arts and culture.”

The DCLA will direct more than $15 million in funds to carry out plans, with an additional funding of $5 million from the City Council, according to a statement.

The full plan can be found at www.CreateNYC.org/ThePlan.

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Big League Trump Supporter

WHAT ABOUT SCHOOLS IN COURT SQUARE … Screw Art … enough with ART!

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MRLIC

The REAL REAL MRLIC here, any post about fake posts is the FAKE HIPSTER MRLIC. Anyway, art should be illegal.

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MRLIC

The REAL MRLIC here. My take on his article is why did JVB let 5 POINTZget developed as it was known around the world? Why did JVB also let rents for artists and renters etc… get unaffordable?

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MRLIC

Even though I agree a bit with the JVB in the pocket of Big Art spending 15 mil dollars post. I did not write that post, THE FAKE MRLIC wrote the July 20, 2017 post /11:22 pm.

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MRLIC

Oh great typical JVB in the pocket of Big Art spending $15 MILLION so LIC kids can play with play-doh. Probably run by the HIPSTERS that gave us the half a million dollar statue made of chewed bubblegum.

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