You are reading

7 train one of “worst offenders” for subway delays, costs NYC economy up to $29 million annually

Oct. 3, 2017 By Nathaly Pesantez

The 7 train is one of four trains deemed the “worst offenders” for subway delays, with delays on this line costing the city between $13.7 million and $29 million annually, according to a recent report from the NYC Comptroller.

The Oct. 1 report breaks down subway lines based on weekday ridership, train schedules, and wait assessments, coming up with a cost analysis based on “best-case”, “mid-range”, and “worst-case” delay scenarios.

The annual economic cost of the 7 train in terms of “best-case” major delays is $13,685,550, based on the more than 117,000 weekday 7 line riders. “Mid-range” major delays on this line result in an annual cost of $18,793,342. The “worst-case” delays on the 7 line cost the city’s economy $29,009,935.

Estimated annual economic cost for first five subway lines

The  analysis uses the midpoint of the range of wait time delays for minor and medium delays and three distinct scenarios for major delays, laying out estimates measured for trains 100 percent, 200 percent, and 400 percent behind schedule. An assumed average hourly salary of $34 per person is also used for calculations.

Trains delayed by 25 percent to 50 percent over their scheduled time are considered “minor”. “Medium” delays range from 50 percent to 100 percent over scheduled time, and “major” delays are those that run 100 percent over scheduled time.

The 7 train is one of five subway lines that most negatively impact economic activity, according to the report. The 5, 7, A, F, and 4 train lines combined cost the city $140 million annually assuming worst-case delays.

Overall, it is estimated that the economic cost of subway delays are up to $389 million annually.

“What these new numbers show is that the cost of inaction is greater than the cost of action; that subway delays take a massive toll on our economy,” said Comptroller Scott M. Stringer.

The report comes after a survey released in July conducted by the Comptroller’s office on the toll subway delays have on people, including arriving to work late, having to walk to work, and even getting fired from a job.

See the full report here .

email the author: [email protected]

9 Comments

Click for Comments 
Anonymous

Reading this article as I’m stuck on a 7 train that hasn’t moved in 20 minutes. Make the pain stop!

Reply
MRLIC

Building without planning never works as I always say. STOP BUILDING in LIC , let us BREATHE.

Reply
stop bringing people here

there are 25k more average weekly am riders on the 7 train than the next highest line (F). That alone should be proof enough to stop development of these high rise buildings!

Reply
Anonymous

Imagine if the city had the vision to invest infrastructure and build a new subway lines to Manhattan from Brooklyn and Queens while they raced to gentrify those areas, made possible by generous tax giveaways and subsidies to rich developers.

That’s the kind of smart forward-looking city that would be well prepared for the 21st century, and not this stupid and unimaginative place that we have become.

Reply
REason

The person to blame is Jimmy Van Bramer who sold out LIC and is trying to sell out Sunnyside train yard to the highest bidder. Van Bramer is a wolf!

Reply
Anonymous

I realize the previous comment was a Dislike magnet, but there is a kernel of truth here. All of NYC public officials — ALL of them — are quick movers when it comes to handouts of public funds to private businesses but slow thinkers when it comes to investing and planning in infrastructure for the rest of us. This is going to be the death of the city. We can’t be innovate and grow if we don’t provide modern and efficient transit and public works systems that support us.

So if the idea is to merely shovel money at Amazon without requiring them to pay for a new link to Manhattan, then we should walk away.

Reply
Totally Yea

Yea the real estate developers and politicians must of been clicking away on the dislikes.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Gunman who fired shots at the Ravenswood Houses in Long Island City remains at large: NYPD

Police from the 114th Precinct in Astoria and PSA 9 are continuing their search for a gunman who allegedly opened fire at the Ravenswood Houses in Long Island City last month.

The incident occurred during the early morning hours of Wednesday, Jan. 18, when officers responded to a 911 call and a ShotSpotter activation for multiple shots fired at 21-25 35 Ave. at the Ravenswood Houses NYCHA complex just after 2 a.m., according to authorities.

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Long Island City teen sentenced in fatal shooting of ‘beloved’ school teacher at Queensbridge Houses in 2020: DA

A Long Island City man on Friday, Jan. 28, was sentenced to 19 years in prison for the 2020 fatal shooting of a public school social studies teacher who was out walking his dog when he was caught in the crossfire during a confrontation between gang rivals in broad daylight, just blocks from his home, according to Queens District Attorney’s office.

Ike Ford, 19, of 12th Street, in Long Island City, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the first degree before Queens Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Holder. The teacher, George Rosa, 53, was shot in his abdomen by a stray bullet fired by Ford, who was just 17 years old at the time of the shooting but was sentenced as an adult given the severity of the crime, according to Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz.