‘Juice Press’ to open retail store and production plant in Long Island City

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2 Responses to ‘Juice Press’ to open retail store and production plant in Long Island City

  1. LICOMP

    a little far from the residential area...hope they will be on seamless!

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  2. Toni Duckworth

    Not at ALL far from residential areas! It is a 5 minute walk from my condo, and I am stoked. LIC desperately needs a great juice shop. I am stoked. No more trekking into Manhattan for a little bit of organic juice! Answer to my prayers. xoxo

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Latest News

Halloween ‘Trick or Treat March’ to be biggest yet
2014 parade route

2014 parade route

Oct. 29, By Michael Florio

The Long Island City Halloween parade is likely to bigger than ever before.

This year’s ‘Halloween Trick-or-Treat March’ is expected to draw as many as 900 people to Vernon Blvd Friday, with more than 40 businesses participating.

The event, in its seventh year, begins at 4:15pm at Gantry Plaza State Park and goes up 48th Avenue. From there it snakes around 5th Street to 50th Avenue. It will then go up 50th Avenue before making a left turn on Vernon Blvd.

Last year, 650 people marched in the parade, with about 400 of them being kids, said Gianna Cerbone-Teoli, the owner of Manducatis Rustica and one of the event organizers. In the first year there were less than 50 children.

The number of businesses that are participating has doubled this year. “All the businesses in Long Island City are invited to participate,” Cerbone-Teoli said.

Businesses will be offering snacks, candy, photos with super heroes, movies and story readings.

Many of the restaurants are also offering dinner and drink specials, according to Cerbone-Teoli.

Cerbone-Teoli also added that residents from Jackson Heights and Sunnyside came to participate in the march last year.

“It’s great when members of other communities come out,” she said.

Some of the businesses that are participating

Some of the businesses that are participating

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Citi Bike to arrive in LIC spring 2015

Citibike2Oct. 28, By Christian Murray

Citi Bike will be coming to Long Island City in the spring of 2015, according to Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer’s office.

Long Island City is likely to get 10 docking stations–which Van Bramer secured in 2012–although some of these sites may be up for review while others added, according to his office.

“I am thrilled that Citi Bike is expanding into Queens,” Van Bramer said in a statement. “I’ve been pushing to have bike share in Western Queens for years and now the dream has become a reality.:

The expansion into LIC is part of a city wide push to bring the bike share program to a more New Yorkers. The Citi Bike system is expected to have more than 700 docking stations by the end of 2017– twice the number as of today.

The expansion is being funded in part by $30 million from private investors Bikeshare Holdings LLC, which has acquired Alta Bicycle Share, the company that runs Citi Bike.

Former MTA head Jay Walder will take over as CEO of Alta, according to the announcement.

LIC docking stations

  • Center of 48th Avenue near Vernon Boulevard – This station will have 31 docks and will be located in a no-parking area of the street)
  • Center of Vernon Boulevard near 50th Avenue (Vernon Mall) – This station will have 31 docks and will be located in a public park or plaza.
  • North side of 45th Road near 11th Street (Murray Playground) – This station will have 27 docks and will be located on the sidewalk.
  • South side of 46th Avenue near Jackson Avenue – This station will have 23 docks and will be located in a no-parking area of the street.
  • South side of 44th Drive near Jackson Avenue – This station will have 35 docks and will be located on private property (pending)
  • West side of 21st Street near 43rd Avenue – This station will have 23 docks and will be located on the sidewalk.
  • West side of 21st Street near Queens Plaza North – This station will have 31 docks and will be located on the sidewalk.
  • South side of Queens Plaza North near Crescent Street – This station will have 31 docks and will be located on the sidewalk.
  • East side of 31st Street near Thomson Avenue – This station will have 27 docks and will be located in a no-parking area of the street.
  • West side of 2nd Street near 54th Avenue (Hunters Point Ferry Terminal) – This station will have 31 docks and will be located on private property (pending)

citibike

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Calls for Clock Tower to be landmarked, advocates seek community board support

Bank1-475x356Oct. 28, By Michael Florio

Two local residents approached Community Board 1 last week to notify them of their application to have the Clock Tower landmarked.

Michael Hall and Matthew Chrislip asked the community board for its support in their quest to get 29-27 Queens Plaza North, better known as the Clock Tower, designated as a landmark.

Hall said that an application had been sent to the Landmarks Preservation Commission last spring, asking the agency to declare the Clock Tower a landmark.

Hall stated that the LPC responded to the request, stating that it will take a close look at the building. He then asked the community board to send a letter of support to the LPC.

Queens architect Morrell Smith designed the Clock Tower, which was originally built for the Bank of Manhattan in 1927. At the time it was the tallest building in Queens, a title which it held until 1990 when it was overtaken by 1 Court Square, which became known as the Citicorp building.

The Clock Tower building has largely been empty for the past 25 years and has most recently been used by art groups.

“It sits at the foot of Queens Plaza overlooking a high-traffic corridor that is currently undergoing massive development,” Hall said.

If it were designated a landmark, any proposed changes to the Clock Tower would have to be reviewed and approved by the LPC.

“Even today, as its visibility is diminished by commercial high-rises and hotel towers that continue to pop up all around it, the tower remains a significant local landmark,” Hall said. “The Clock Tower is widely admired among members of the Long Island City and Dutch Kills communities for its unique architectural contributions to the area.”

Hall said he is confident that the Clock Tower not only meets, but exceeds, the standards for evaluation as an individual landmark.

Criterion Group, a residential development company, purchased the clock tower in May.

Community Board 1 Chairman Vinicio Donato stated that the request will be reviewed by the board and that the Parks and Recreation committee will make a motion whether to support it not. The entire board will then vote, whether they should send the LPC a letter backing the Clock Tower as a landmark.

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The Beast Next Door to open late November

beastOct. 28, By Michael Florio

The beast is coming soon to LIC.

The Beast Next Door, a neighborhood café and bar located at 42-51 27th Street, is set to open in about a month.

It will be a café by day and a full bar by night, according to owner John Veenema.

The menu will consist of combination plates, which will include Italian cured meats and French cheeses–served with bread, slices of fruit and nuts. There will also be sandwiches, salads and pastries.

“We want to serve high quality food items,” Veenema said. “There will be no fried food served here.”

To drink, Veenema said he will have four beers on tap, which will consist of two light and two heavier beers.

He said that he is considering beer brewed by the Rockaway Brewing Company.

beast4There will also be a full liquor bar and a variety of wine.

Veenema said he is in the final stage of opening the bar. He is currently hiring staff, ordering drinks, as well as purchasing supplies such as glasses.

He said there will be a grand opening event, perhaps with live music, but the details still have to be worked out.

Veenema, who has a background in visual arts, has gone to great length in designing the cafe/bar. Inside, hangs an old chandelier and placed alongside the walls are old church pews, which will be used as benches. Meanwhile, the tables are made out of salvaged pallets and even a wooden prison door.

The café/bar also features a raised area toward the back of the establishment, which will serve as a seating area at times and as an area for live music.

Along the back wall there is a woodcut Turkish design mural, which Veenema made himself.

“The bar will be elegant and have a romantic feel,” he said. “I want people to feel comfortable here, to have a conversation, and for people to get to know one another.”

The café/bar has room for about 74 people, and while there won’t be sidewalk seating there will be French-style doors, which will open up to the street.

“It will feel like you are outside on nice days,” Veenema said.

This is Veenema’s first bar, but he has experience in the industry as he previously worked at Block Star, a Manhattan bar that has since closed.

Veenema, who is originally from Canada, has lived in LIC for the past five years. Prior to that, he spent 15 years living in Manhattan.

Veenema said there is a great deal of interest in his establishment.

“I can’t go outside without people stopping me and asking me when will it open,” he said.

He added that his café/bar is in a section of Long Island City that is undergoing a great deal of development, yet still offers limited options for residents. He hopes to create a friendly environment where customers will come in and know one another.

“We want to be a place where residents can come and have a conversation,” he said. “It will be a place to come, hang out and relax.”

He knew he wanted to open his business in Long Island City and landed on this location once he was able to obtain the lease–as most property owners were looking to sell, not rent.

beast1

dunkin'Meanwhile, in other news, signage for a Dunkin’ Donuts has gone up at 44-80 21st Street.

The sign caught the attention of students passing by who shouted: “Yes! Can’t wait for it to open.”

 

 

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CB1 votes against bicycle corral outside Dutch Kills pub

dutch

Oct. 27, By Michael Florio

Community Board 1 voted against the placement of a bicycle corral outside a bar/restaurant in Dutch Kills last Tuesday.

The proposal called for a corral– with room for eight bicycles–to be located outside Dutch Kills Centraal, a gastro pub situated at 38-40 29th Street. However, the corral, would result in the loss of a parking space.

Community Board 1 said its decision was largely based on the feedback it received from nearby residents. The board said it put the matter up for a vote by circulating voter cards in Dutch Kills buildings – as well at this month’s Dutch Kills Civic Association meeting.

Robert Piazza, who is the chairman of Community Board 1’s Transportation Committee, said that the majority of those residents who voted were against it. He said the vote was 90 for the corral and 116 against.

Therefore, he said, the transportation committee opposed to.

The full board heard the recommendation and 15 members decided to vote against it while 9 for it.

Dominic Stiller, the owner of Dutch Kills Centraal, was the leading advocate for the corral. He said that the board did not give him a fair chance to present his plan.

“There is a real backlash against bicyclists from those who are afraid of losing their parking spots,” he said. “They would rather see bicycles jammed up against the pedestrian sidewalk.”

Stiller questioned the transparency of the 116 vs 90 vote. He said that each vote–containing the resident’s name and address– should be made public. He said the community board excluded some valid votes from people who live in nearby neighborhoods.

“[CB1] arbitrarily threw out a lot of positive comments from people that work in the area and that’s unfair,” he said. “They live in other areas but work here and their votes should count.”

Furthermore, “They are not letting anyone see the results,” he said

However, Hartmann said that many voters wanted their information to be kept confidential. “I am not going to give out the names and addresses of the people who voted against him. I don’t think that’s fair,” she said.

Stiller also said that there were not enough CB1 board members at the meeting to ensure a proper vote– as there were only 23 out of the 50 members in attendance at the time of the vote.

Despite their being a lack of a quorum, a quorum is only required on votes concerning land use matters, said Lucille Hartmann, Community Board 1 district manager,

Jean Cawley, a member of the Dutch Kills Civic Association and Stiller’s wife, addressed the board stating that the bike coral would encourage bike riding, which is a healthy alternative to driving and decreases pollution.

“I want my community to be more livable,” she said.“Making bicycling easier, safer and more convenient will improve everyone’s quality of life.”

Vinicio Donato, Chairman of CB1, questioned Cawley if she believes bicyclists should have to follow the same traffic rules as automobiles, stating that from what he had witnessed “bicyclist have no regards for an automobile and do not follow traffic laws.”

Cawley said it would be up to the police to enforce traffic laws upon bicyclists, and added that saying no to everything bicycle related is not the answer.

One board member said that it was not fair to ask question about the actions of other riders.

After the meeting, Cawley wrote to the Transportation Commission Polly Trottenberg, Streetsblog reported, stating that “Queens CB1 is decidedly ‘anti-bike’” and that “I feel disenfranchised by their constant ‘no’ votes to anything that would increase or improve bicycling infrastructure and safety.”

2014 10 Bike Corrals Qn Cb1

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Houseware/Hardware store expected to open next month, while French bakery and beer shop open

kitchen and more

Oct. 24, By Christian Murray

A kitchen and hardware store located at 47-17 5th Street is expected to open next month.

Ovidio Teja, the owner of Kitchen Plus More, is just waiting on Con Ed approval before he can open.

Taja, who has worked as the general manager at Food Cellar since it opened in 2008, said that he decided to open a kitchen/hardware store since so many grocery store customers would complain that there wasn’t such a store in Hunters Point.

The 2,500 square foot store will sell “anything you can image for the home,” Teja said, whether it be bed sheets or screwdrivers.

The store is currently packed with pots & pans, plumbing items, paint, ironing boards, kitchen appliances to glassware. He said that customers will also be able to get their keys cut at the store too.

He said that anything people can get at Home Depot they will be able to get at his store.

Meanwhile, in other news, the Beer Closet opened last week, while Cannelle Patisserie, the French bakery, opened yesterday.

In addition, Urban Market, the gourmet store located at 2-14 50th Avenue, is expected to open during the first week of November, the general manager said today.

Beer Closet

 

French bakery

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Owner of ‘I Love Kickboxing LIC’ seeks permit, aims to open before June
45-45 Center Blvd

45-45 Center Blvd

Oct. 23, By Christian Murray

Representatives of “I Love Kick Boxing LIC,” who aim to open a facility on the ground floor at 45-45 Center Boulevard, went before Community Board 2 last week seeking a “physical cultural establishment” permit as part of their quest to open in the first or second quarter next year.

New York City requires all health clubs, gyms or spas to obtain the permit in order to make sure that massage parlors or other undesirable establishments don’t open.

Frederick Becker, the attorney representing I Love Kick Boxing LIC, said the venue will focus primarily on physical fitness.

He said the 2,800-square foot facility would essentially be like “aerobics on steroids.”

Becker said the facility will be part of a well established franchise (see corporate website). There are branches throughout the US, including four in Queens.

The work outs, according to the corporate Facebook page, typically involve punching and kicking bags. The website said that participants learn techniques used by pro fighters like jabs, crosses, hooks, roundhouse kicks and front kicks, according to the corporate website. It also involves a series of exercises.

The facility would not be a venue where sparring or fights take place as there are no plans for a ring, according to Becker. Its focus is on fitness, conditioning and weight loss.

Becker said that the owner plans is to operate between 6 am and 10 pm (Mon-Friday) and 7am to 2 pm on weekends.

He said that the owner is working with the landlord and acoustic engineers to protect the residents from noise.

The facility will primarily provide classes—catering to groups of about 30 people. Becker said that each class is about 45-50 minutes long.

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Communitea, long-time Vernon Blvd coffee shop, is closing

Communitea_BldgOct. 22, By Christian Murray

Communitea, the long-time coffee shop located at 47-02 Vernon Blvd, announced on Facebook Monday that it is closing.

The owners said that the coffee shop will be closing this Sunday since they had difficultly negotiating a new lease.

“We thank you for a wonderful decade of support and friendship. It has been our pleasure to be a part of this community and we are grateful for the opportunity to make so many amazing friends,” the owners wrote.

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Red-hot LIC rental market shows signs of cooling down

Linc-LICOct. 20, By Christian Murray

The upward trajectory of the Long Island City rental market is beginning to show signs that it is tapering off, with rental prices down in the third quarter compared to the second.

The cool down was also evident on a year-over-year basis with rents up only slightly compared to 3Q 2013, according to a recent report.

Modern Spaces, a LIC-based real estate firm, reported that rental prices for luxury apartments dipped by about 5 percent on average in the third quarter compared to the second. For instance, the rent charged for a luxury studio was $2,369 in 3Q 2014, down from $2,558 in the second quarter (see rental figures below). Meanwhile, the rent for a one bedroom luxury unit dropped from $3,158 to $3,013 over that period.

“The past quarter we are really seeing the rental market stabilizing and leveling out,” said Eric Benaim, the CEO of Modern Spaces, in a statement. “With all the new projects that have come online this year, competition between buildings is becoming increasingly apparent and the prices of rentals in the area have started to adjust.”

This year alone, TF Cornerstone began leasing its sixth and final luxury building – 46-10 Center B lvd—which is comprised of 584 units. Meanwhile, Rockrose announced in August that it had fully leased its 709-unit luxury building called Linc LIC.

Rockrose has started construction on a 50 story mixed-used development at 43-25 Hunter Street, which will include 974 rental units. That should be completed by 2017.

Despite the recent slowdown, on a year-over-year basis luxury rentals were up about 4 percent, according to the report. In 3Q 2013, a luxury studio was renting for $2,320 (compared to $2,369 in 3Q14)—while a luxury one bedroom for $2,901 (compared to $3,013 in 3Q14). Furthermore, a 2 bedroom in 3Q 2013 went for $4,106, while in 3Q 2014 it fetched $4,134.

The big firms such as TF Cornerstone and Rockrose are still not offering much in the way of incentives. It is rare to find one month free rent, although the developers will cover the cost of the brokerage fee.

q314

3Q13

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Owner of ‘I Love Kickboxing LIC’ seeks permit, aims to open before June
45-45 Center Blvd

45-45 Center Blvd

Oct. 23, By Christian Murray Representatives of “I Love Kick Boxing LIC,” who aim to open a facility on the ground floor at 45-45 Center Boulevard, went before Community Board 2 last week seeking a “physical cultural establishment” permit as part of their quest to open in the first or second quarter next year. New York City requires all health clubs, gyms or spas to obtain the permit in order to make sure that massage parlors or other undesirable establishments don't open. Frederick Becker, the attorney representing I Love Kick Boxing LIC, said the venue will focus primarily on physical fitness. He said the 2,800-square foot facility would essentially be like “aerobics on steroids.” Becker said the facility will be part of a well established franchise (see corporate website). There are branches throughout the US, including four in Queens. The work outs, according to the corporate Facebook page, typically involve punching and kicking bags. The website said that participants learn techniques used by pro fighters like jabs, crosses, hooks, roundhouse kicks and front kicks, according to the corporate website. It also involves a series of exercises. The facility would not be a venue where sparring or fights take place as there are no plans for a ring, according to Becker. Its focus is on fitness, conditioning and weight loss. Becker said that the owner plans is to operate between 6 am and 10 pm (Mon-Friday) and 7am to 2 pm on weekends. He said that the owner is working with the landlord and acoustic engineers to protect the residents from noise. The facility will primarily provide classes—catering to groups of about 30 people. Becker said that each class is about 45-50 minutes long.
Communitea, long-time Vernon Blvd coffee shop, is closing
Communitea_BldgOct. 22, By Christian Murray Communitea, the long-time coffee shop located at 47-02 Vernon Blvd, announced on Facebook Monday that it is closing. The owners said that the coffee shop will be closing this Sunday since they had difficultly negotiating a new lease. “We thank you for a wonderful decade of support and friendship. It has been our pleasure to be a part of this community and we are grateful for the opportunity to make so many amazing friends," the owners wrote.
Red-hot LIC rental market shows signs of cooling down
Linc-LICOct. 20, By Christian Murray The upward trajectory of the Long Island City rental market is beginning to show signs that it is tapering off, with rental prices down in the third quarter compared to the second. The cool down was also evident on a year-over-year basis with rents up only slightly compared to 3Q 2013, according to a recent report. Modern Spaces, a LIC-based real estate firm, reported that rental prices for luxury apartments dipped by about 5 percent on average in the third quarter compared to the second. For instance, the rent charged for a luxury studio was $2,369 in 3Q 2014, down from $2,558 in the second quarter (see rental figures below). Meanwhile, the rent for a one bedroom luxury unit dropped from $3,158 to $3,013 over that period. “The past quarter we are really seeing the rental market stabilizing and leveling out,” said Eric Benaim, the CEO of Modern Spaces, in a statement. “With all the new projects that have come online this year, competition between buildings is becoming increasingly apparent and the prices of rentals in the area have started to adjust.” This year alone, TF Cornerstone began leasing its sixth and final luxury building – 46-10 Center B lvd—which is comprised of 584 units. Meanwhile, Rockrose announced in August that it had fully leased its 709-unit luxury building called Linc LIC. Rockrose has started construction on a 50 story mixed-used development at 43-25 Hunter Street, which will include 974 rental units. That should be completed by 2017. Despite the recent slowdown, on a year-over-year basis luxury rentals were up about 4 percent, according to the report. In 3Q 2013, a luxury studio was renting for $2,320 (compared to $2,369 in 3Q14)—while a luxury one bedroom for $2,901 (compared to $3,013 in 3Q14). Furthermore, a 2 bedroom in 3Q 2013 went for $4,106, while in 3Q 2014 it fetched $4,134. The big firms such as TF Cornerstone and Rockrose are still not offering much in the way of incentives. It is rare to find one month free rent, although the developers will cover the cost of the brokerage fee. q314 3Q13
No. 7 train weekend service to be cut for 5 weekends this fall
7subway1Oct. 17, Staff Report The MTA has announced that the No. 7 train will be down between Times Square and Queensboro Plaza for five weekends this fall. In addition, No. 7 train service will be reduced between 74th Street Broadway and Queensboro Plaza. The cuts begin this weekend, with service down from Saturday (Oct. 18) at 2 am through Monday (Oct 20) at 5 am. The cuts will also take place on the following weekends—starting at 11:30pm through Monday at 5am. Oct 24-27 Nov. 7-10 Nov 14-17 Nov. 21-24 The MTA said that it needs to work on weekends in order to complete its capital improvements. These include new signal systems, track replacement and Sandy recovery work. The MTA said that it will be offering free shuttle buses between Vernon Blvd/Jackson Ave. and Queensboro Plaza during the shutdown.
Parking costs might rise in LIC, as DOT has preliminary plans to introduce ‘Park Smart’
metersOct. 17, By Christian Murray Representatives from the Department of Transportation attended a Community Board 2 meeting last week and introduced a preliminary plan to introduce “Park Smart”-- a program that aims to free up parking spaces--in Sunnyside, Woodside and Long Island City. The program attempts to reduce the time it takes for motorists to find parking in business districts-- by changing meter rates, extending park hours and modifying commercial parking zones. The program was first introduced in Queens in 2013, with the implementation of a pilot program in Jackson Heights. The program typically focuses on changing the meter rates to encourage short-term parking through “progressive” rates. For instance on certain streets in Jackson Heights, it now costs 50 cents to park for 30 minutes, $1:50 for an hour, $2:50 for 90 minutes and $4 for 2 hours. However, in some cases, the parking period has been extended on certain streets. For instance, one hour limits have been increased to two. Park Smart typically aims to change the commercial parking and delivery zones. “Early Morning Delivery Zones” are often established to provide loading space before the meters turn on at 10 a.m., and “Paid Commercial Parking Zones” reserve daytime metered spaces for commercial uses. The Department of Transportation will not introduce the system unless business owners opt into the program. The DOT representatives told the Community Board 2 that it will reach out to Sunnyside Shines Business Improvement District, the Long Island City Partnership and Woodside on the Move to get their feedback. Those groups are likely to conduct a survey of local businesses to get their feedback. Park Smart is not a program that typically goes into effect overnight as the DOT typically evaluates each street to determine whether the parking times and rates need to be modified. Furthermore it is typically implemented as a pilot program before becoming permanent. The programs were made permanent in Park Slope and Greenwich Village, after they were deemed effective, according to the DOT. However, the pilot program on Madison Avenue and East 86th Street was brought to a halt after it was viewed as being ineffective, according to published reports. For more information on Park Smart click here https://www.scribd.com/doc/243356677/Jackson-Heights-PARK-Smart
Police seek man who allegedly punched 65-year-old in face
suspect

suspect

Oct. 17, Staff Report The police are looking to locate a suspect who allegedly punched a 65-year-old man in the face last month. The suspect allegedly struck the man at ENC Market, located at 5 Court Square, after he asked the victim for the phone number to a car service.. The 65-year-old victim said that he not have a phone number and carried on with his business. The suspect was upset and then punched the suspect in the face causing swelling to his left cheek and eye. The incident occurred on Sept. 22 at 10:50 pm. Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800-577-TIPS.
LIC’s underground stations now have Wifi
Vernonirtstairlar Oct. 16, By Michael Florio The MTA announced today that it had completed Phase II of its seven-phase plan to bring WiFi service to all 277 underground stations in New York City. The second phase has brought WiFi service to an additional 11 Manhattan and 29 Queens stations--including several in Long Island City and Astoria. The total number of underground stations with WiFi service has now reached 76. Phase II provides WiFi service to the underground stations in Long Island City and Astoria. The Vernon/Jackson and Hunters Point Ave. stations are now covered by Phase II, as well as Grand Central and 42nd Bryant Park, which are key stations for 7 train riders. Times Square was part of phase I. The Court Square station (which caters to the E, G, M and 7) was also added under the wireless plan. Astoria residents who take the R train will also receive WiFi service. The service—under Phase II—is now available at the Queens Plaza, 36th Street, 46th Street and Steinway Street stations. "Subway riders will now always be connected with our WiFi," said Bill Bayne, CEO of Transit Wireless, which has partnered with the MTA. "We as consumers expect to be connected 24/7 no matter where we are.” The WiFi, which provides voice and data service, is also viewed as increasing public safety—since people will be able to make calls from these station. “Whether you’re checking your email, calling your kids or looking for emergency assistance, wireless service will bring the conveniences we’re used to above ground into the subway system," MTA Chairman Thomas Prendergast said. “This is a win for the riders in my district and all over the city,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer. “Riders will now get the convenient and comfortable ride that they look for every day.” Phase three will bring WiFi to another 105 stations and is expected to be completed by spring 2015. The entire seven-phase project will cost upwards of $300 million.

Phase 1 Phase 2 Stations

Application period for Hunters Point South has begun
Hunters Point South buildingOct. 15, By Christian Murray The application period for the apartments at the Hunters Point South Development went live today. The application forms can be filled out on line at New York Housing Connect  (https://a806-housingconnect.nyc.gov/nyclottery/lottery.html#home), which requires applicants to provide details such as their income and apartment sought. Those interested have until December 15 to submit an application. There are 925 apartments up for grabs, with 186 apartments available to those applicants who fall into the “low income” bracket. To qualify as low income, an applicant seeking a studio cannot make more than $30,000—while a family seeking a 3 bedroom unit must earn less than $50,000 per year. For those who qualify for the “low income” bracket, the rents would range in price from $494 per month for a studio to as high as $959 for a three bedroom. However, the limits are significantly higher for the 738 “moderate income” apartments on offer. The maximum income permitted to be eligible for a studio is a little over $130,000, while the maximum household income for a 3 bedroom unit is about $225,000. The rents for “moderate income” earners will range from $1,561-$1997 for a studio, $1,965-2,509 for a one bedroom, $2,366-$3,300 for a 2 bedroom and $2,729-$4,346 for a three bedroom. Preference will be given to applicants who live within the Community Board 2 district, which covers Sunnyside, Woodside and Long Island City. affordablerents affordablehousingmoderate income
Court Square: Planned Parenthood to break ground on first Queens facility
Rendering

Rendering

By Michael Florio Planned Parenthood of New York City (PPNYC) will be breaking ground Thursday on its first healthcare center in Queens. The new center is being constructed in the Court Square section of Long Island City, at 21-41 45th Road. It is expected to open in 2015. The 14,000-square-foot facility center, like other centers, will offer abortions, breast and cervical cancer screenings, birth control, STD testing and treatment, and routine gynecological exams. Planned Parenthood, a non-profit center, anticipates that it will serve 17,500 patients annually at the location. In a statement, PPNYC said that thousands of Queens patients have to travel to other boroughs to receive its services. “The new health center will strengthen our ability to provide Queens residents with the essential reproductive health care services they need,” said Joan Malin, President and CEO of PPNYC. Planned Parenthood estimates that one in five women in Queens do not have health insurance. Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer who allocated $750,000 of city funds to help bring the Long Island City facility to the area, said earlier this year that it was important to bring essential “healthcare for women and all new Yorkers” to Queens. Malin said PPNYC selected this location because Court Square is accessible to subway lines. Meanwhile, Life News, a news site catering toward the pro-life movement, was less than happy about the announcement. “Forty percent of Unborn Babies in New York City are Aborted, Planned Parenthood Wants More,” referring to the new facility. The abortion rate in New York City has been falling. The Health Department reported that in 2012, 38 percent of viable pregnancies ended in “induced terminations.”
21-45 45th Road, Court Square

21-45 45th Road, Court Square

 
8 people isolated — and later cleared–after suspicious powder discovered in LIC building
ambulance-e1412871498173Oct. 14, By Michael Florio (Update: 7:30 pm) A suspicious white powder was discovered this morning at the headquarters of the New York City Housing Authority in Long Island City this morning. Eight people were initially isolated by the FDNY-- but they were later cleared. The powder was discovered on the fourth floor of the 23-02 49th Avenue building, around 10:50 am, inside a letter that was opened in the mail room, according to a NYPD spokesperson. The Department of Environmental Protection is currently testing the powder to identify what it is but the NYPD said it was unlikely to be hazardous. There were no injuries, the NYPD said, and the building was not evacuated.  
Cathy Nolan’s opponent for Assembly a long shot
JohnKwilsonOct. 13, By Christian Murray This November’s election for Assembly District 37 is practically a formality. Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan (D), who has been in office representing a large portion of Western Queens since 1984, faces a contender who has run against her twice before and was thumped each time. Nolan has name recognition, the benefit of incumbency, strong party backing and has raised more than $130,000 in campaign funds since 2010 (Friends of Catherine Nolan and Nolan for Assembly). She has moved up the ranks over the years, where she has chaired the Banking as well as Labor committees. She is currently the chair of the Education Committee. Meanwhile, her challenger John K. Wilson, a Sunnyside barman/actor, has raised $10,000 in campaign funds (Committee to elect John K Wilson) since 2010 and has virtually no name recognition. His best effort against Nolan came in 2010 when he generated 16% of the vote, after he ran a confrontational—and at times—negative campaign (see website). Wilson said he is running in order to introduce term limits and bring an end to the Queens Democratic machine. “There is too much power in too few hands,” he said. “Six years in office should be the limit,” Wilson said. “I want to put an end to career politicians.” “The longer someone is in power the less work they do for the people,” he said. “They take the job for granted and focus on moving up within the party.” Wilson, who ran as a Republican in his past two campaigns, is running for office as a Libertarian this year. He switched parties, he said, so people would listen to his positions. “When I ran as a Republican [in 2010 and 2012], people would shut the door in my face and not even listen to my ideas,” he said. “People associate you as Dick Cheney, which is not the case. This time, some people might tell me they are Cathy [Nolan] supporters but at least they will listen to me.” His platform is based around free market economics. He said businesses are over regulated, over taxed and subject to too much bureaucracy. “New York State is very unfriendly to business and that is why many are leaving to go to other states.” He cited the battle in Long Island City over the use of back yard space as an example of unnecessary bureaucracy. “Local restaurants hire people, want to do what is right by the community and are losing revenue,” he said. “These owners don’t want to be bad neighbors,” he said. “It is not in their interest to have loud noise at night. Why not a compromise?” He said that he opposes the concept of affordable housing, which he views as a “buzzword” to make it appear as though elected officials are “helping the little people.” He said the term “affordable” has never been defined and believes that market forces are the answer. Wilson, who supports gay marriage and is pro-choice, said that he wants the number of charter schools to be expanded. He said charter schools benefit poor and minority students and many parents want to send their children to these schools since they provide the best chance these children have for success. He also said that the state needs to cut spending and focus more on reducing taxes."Lower taxes equal more jobs," he said. Most of all, Wilson said that voters need a choice come Election Day (Nov. 4) and said it is disappointing that many legislators are running unopposed. “Without a choice we enter into Soviet style government,” he said.

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